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Rasagiline

rasagiline

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By Medicover Hospitals / 11 Mar 2021
Home | Medicine | Rasagiline

What is Rasagiline ?

  • Rasagiline is an irreversible monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor used as a monotherapy or as an adjunct therapy to treat early Parkinson's disease symptoms. It is used for treatment for stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control. It is sometimes combined with another medication known as levodopa.
    1. Rasagiline Uses
    2. Rasagiline Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Rasagiline overdose
    5. Storage
    6. Rasagiline vs Selegiline
    7. Frequently Asked Questions
    8. Citations

    Rasagiline Uses:

  • It is used to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms alone or in combination with other medications (such as levodopa/carbidopa). It can help with symptoms like shakiness, stiffness, and difficulty moving. It can also assist in reducing the amount of "off" time (periods of slow movement or stiffness). Rasagiline is an MAO inhibitor, which is a type of medication. It works by raising the concentrations of certain natural substances in the brain (such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin).
  • How to use Rasagiline?

    • Take this medication orally, with or without food, once daily.
    • The dosage is determined by your health condition, response to treatment, and any other medications you are taking. Inform your doctor about all of the products you use. Do not increase your dosage or take it more frequently than recommended. Your condition will not improve faster, and your chances of experiencing side effects will increase.
    • Do not discontinue taking this medication without first consulting your doctor. When this medication is abruptly discontinued, some conditions may worsen. Your dose might be gradually reduced.
    • If you consume a large amount of tyramine while taking this medicine for two weeks you may experience very serious high blood pressure reaction. Tyramine-rich foods, such as aged cheeses, should be avoided (such as Stilton cheese). Consult your doctor or a dietician about which foods to avoid and whether you feel ill after eating or drinking certain foods while taking this medication.

    Rasagiline Side Effects:

    • Depressed mood
    • Sleep problems
    • Insomnia
    • Strange dreams
    • Involuntary muscle movements
    • Loss of appetite
    • Indigestion
    • Stomach pain
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Constipation
    • Joint pain
    • Rash
    • Cough
    • Flu symptoms
    • Dry mouth
    • Swelling of hands or feet

    Precautions:

  • Inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to this, or if you have any other allergies.
  • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist about any medical conditions you have, especially if you have: liver disease, glaucoma, breathing problems, heart disease, kidney disease, stomach/intestinal ulcer, mood disorders, blood disorders.
  • This drug can make you feel dizzy or drowsy. Alcohol might make you more dizzy or drowsy. This medication should be used only when it is prescribed by a doctor during pregnancy. It is not known if it enters breast milk or not. Before breastfeeding, talk to your doctor.
  • Interactions:

    • Diet pills/appetite suppressants, drugs for attention deficit disorder, apraclonidine, bupropion, buspirone, carbamazepine, cyclobenzaprine, deutetrabenazine, dextromethorphan, methyldopa, certain supplements, tetrabenazine, certain triptans used to treat migraine headaches, valbenazine are some products that may interact with this drug.
    • If you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin, your risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity increases. When you increase the dose of these drugs, the risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity may increase.
    • Some products can interact with rasagiline if taken concurrently, or even if taken weeks before or after rasagiline. Tell your doctor if you took fluoxetine within the last 5 weeks before starting rasagiline. Inquire with your doctor about the time interval between starting or stopping any of these medications and starting rasagiline.
    • Taking this medication with other MAO inhibitors may result in a dangerous drug interaction. Do not take any other MAO inhibitors while taking this medication. Most MAO inhibitors should also be avoided for two weeks prior to and following treatment with this medication. Consult your doctor about when to begin or stop taking this medication.
    • Report the use of drugs that may increase the risk of extremely high blood pressure when combined with rasagiline, such as herbal products, allergy and cough-and-cold products, and stimulants, before using rasagiline. Rasagiline should not be combined with any of these drugs.

    Overdose:

  • If someone has taken an overdose of this medicine and has serious symptoms such as trouble breathing, seek medical advice immediately. Never take more doses than what is prescribed to you by your doctor.
  • Missed Dose:

  • It is necessary to take each dose of this medication on time. If you forget a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible to arrange for a new dosing schedule. Do not double the dose.
  • Storage:

  • The medicine must not come in contact with heat, air, light and may damage your medicines.
  • The medicine must be kept in a safe place and far away from children’s reach.
  • Rasagiline vs Selegiline:

    Rasagiline
    Selegiline
    Rasagiline is an irreversible monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor used as a monotherapy or as an adjunct therapy to treat early Parkinson's disease symptoms. Selegiline, also known as L-deprenyl and marketed under the brand names Eldepryl and Emsam
    It is used to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms alone or in combination with other medications (such as levodopa/carbidopa). It is a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease and major depressive disorder.
    It works by raising the concentrations of certain natural substances in the brain (such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin). Selegiline is a selective MAO-B inhibitor that inhibits it irreversibly by binding to it covalently. It works by preventing the breakdown of dopamine, thereby increasing its activity.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Rasagiline is used for treating Parkinson's disease symptoms such as stiffness, tremors, spasms, poor muscle control. Rasagiline is sometimes combined with another medication known as levodopa.
    According to an FDA review, rasagiline, which is already approved to treat Parkinson's disease symptoms, does not appear to be effective at slowing the progression of the neurodegenerative disease
    Rasagiline inhibits striatal dopamine metabolism, providing relief from Parkinson's disease motor symptoms. It is administered once daily and, unlike selegiline, is metabolized to non-amphetamine compounds. Rasagiline was found to be effective, safe, and well-tolerated as monotherapy in a large clinical trial in early Parkinson's disease.
    Take rasagiline tablets exactly as directed by your doctor. One tablet per day. Try to take the tablets at the same time every day to help you remember to take them. Taken before or after meals.
    The most common adverse reactions were peripheral edema, fall, arthralgia, cough, and insomnia (incidence in AZILECT-treated patients was 3% or higher than in placebo-treated patients).
    It works by raising the concentrations of certain natural substances in the brain (such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin).
    Inquire with your doctor about the time interval between starting or stopping any of these medications and starting rasagiline. Combining this medication with other MAO inhibitors may result in a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction.
    Yes, its side effects can cause constipation.

    Citations:

  • Rasagiline, https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00003495-200767120-00006
  • Rasagiline in early Parkinson disease, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15096406/