info@medicoverhospitals.in
 040-68334455

Paroxetine

paroxetine

Find a Doctor:   

        Search
By Medicover Hospitals / 10 Mar 2021
Home | Medicine | Paroxetine

What is Paroxetine?

  • Paroxetine is an antidepressant that belongs to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors class of medicines (SSRIs). Paroxetine affects brain chemicals that may be out of control in individuals suffering from depression, anxiety, or other mental illnesses. Paroxetine is a medication that is used to treat depression, especially major depressive disorder.
    1. Paroxetine Uses
    2. Paroxetine Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Overdose
    5. Storage
    6. Paroxetine vs Fluoxetine
    7. Frequently Asked Questions
    8. Citations

    Paroxetine Uses:

  • Paroxetine is an antidepressant that is often used to treat panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It functions by assisting in the restoration of a natural substance (serotonin) balance in the brain. Paroxetine is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is selective (SSRI). This medication can help you regain interest in daily activities by improving your mood, sleep, appetite, and energy levels. It has been shown to reduce fear, anxiety, intrusive thoughts, and panic attacks. It may also lessen the desire to perform repetitive tasks (compulsions like hand-washing, counting, and checking) that obstruct everyday life.
  • How to use?

    • Before you start taking paroxetine, read the Medication Guide and the Patient Information Leaflet given by your pharmacist. Inquire with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any concerns.
    • Take this medicine orally, with or without food, once daily in the morning, as instructed by your doctor. It's possible that taking this drug with food will help you feel better. Speak to your doctor about taking this drug in the evening if it makes you tired throughout the day.
    • The dosage is decided by your medical condition, treatment reaction, age, and any other drugs you are taking. Your doctor can start you on a low dose and gradually increase it to reduce the risk of side effects. Carefully follow the doctor's orders. Do not increase your dosages or take this medication more often or for longer than what is recommended to you. Your condition will not change much sooner, and you will be more susceptible to side effects. To get the most benefits from this drug, take it on a daily basis. Each day, take it at the same time.
    • The tablet should not be chewed or crushed before use, according to the manufacturer. Many related drugs, on the other hand, maybe chewed or crushed. Observe the doctor's instructions.
    • If you're taking paroxetine for premenstrual problems, your doctor might tell you to take it every day of the month or only for the two weeks leading up to your period's first full day.
    • Even if you feel fine, keep taking this drug. Do not quit taking this drug without first consulting your doctor. When this medication is abruptly stopped, some conditions can worsen. Mood swings, headaches, tiredness, sleep shifts, and brief electric shock-like sensations are all possible symptoms. Your doctor may gradually decrease your dose to prevent these symptoms.

    Paroxetine Side Effects:

    • Nausea
    • Sleepiness
    • Weakness
    • Dizziness
    • Drowsiness
    • Lightheadedness
    • Headache
    • Anxiousness
    • Sleeplessness
    • Impotence
    • Sweating
    • Shaking
    • Decreased appetite
    • Dry mouth
    • Constipation
    • Infection
    • Yawning

    Precautions:

    • If you are allergic to paroxetine or have some other reactions, notify your doctor or pharmacist before taking it. Inactive ingredients can be present in this product, causing allergic reactions or other issues.
    • Inform your doctor about any kind of medical history you had previously, particularly if you have a personal or family history of bipolar or manic-depressive disorder, a personal or family history of seizures, liver or kidney problems, low sodium in the blood, intestinal peptic ulcer disease or bleeding problems, or a personal or family history of glaucoma.
    • This medication can cause dizziness, drowsiness, or blurred vision. You can get dizzy or sleepy if you consume alcohol or marijuana (cannabis). Do not drive, operate machinery, or perform any other activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can do so safely. Alcoholic drinks should be avoided.
    • Older adults might be more sensitive towards the side effects of this drug, especially bleeding or loss of coordination. Older adults are also more likely to develop a form of salt imbalance (hyponatremia), especially if they take water pills (diuretics). Falls may be exacerbated by a loss of control.
    • Children may be more reactive towards the drug's side effects, appetite loss, and weight loss. In children who are taking this medication, keep track of their weight and height.
    • It is not advised to take this drug while pregnant. It has the potential to damage an unborn child, and babies born to mothers who used it during the last three months of pregnancy may experience withdrawal symptoms including feeding/breathing problems, seizures, muscle weakness, or excessive crying. However, since untreated mental/mood issues (such as depression, panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and anxiety) will affect a pregnant woman and her unborn child, do not stop taking this drug until your doctor tells you to.
    • This medicine might pass into the breastmilk. Therefore, consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

    Interactions:

  • Paroxetine oral tablet can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbal supplements you are taking. When a substance alters the way a drug functions, this is known as an effect. This can be dangerous or impair the drug's effectiveness.
  • To prevent drug reactions, your doctor should closely monitor all of your drugs. Make sure your doctor is aware of any medications, vitamins, or herbs you're using. Consult your doctor or pharmacist to learn how this medication can interact with other medications you're taking
  • Overdose:

  • If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, seek medical advice. Do not take more than what is prescribed to you by your doctor.
  • Missed Dose:

  • If you forget to take any dose, take it as soon as you remember it. If it is already near to the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose.
  • Storage:

  • Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications far away from kids. Don’t flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so.
  • Paroxetine vs Fluoxetine

    Paroxetine
    Fluoxetine
    Paroxetine is an antidepressant that belongs to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors class of medicines (SSRIs). Fluoxetine is an antidepressant that works by blocking serotonin reuptake
    Paroxetine affects brain chemicals that may be out of control in individuals suffering from depression, anxiety, or other mental illnesses. Fluoxetine helps people with depression, panic, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms by inhibiting the uptake of serotonin by nerve cells (neurons).
    Paroxetine is a medication that is used to treat depression, especially major depressive disorder. It is often used to treat panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Severe depressive disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, panic disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder are all treated with it

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Paroxetine is an SSRI, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor). It's often used to treat depression, but it's also used to treat OCD, panic attacks, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
    Paroxetine is the most powerful inhibitor among serotonin reuptake of all the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and it has been tested extensively in a number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
    Irritability, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, nightmares, headaches, and/or paresthesias are some of the withdrawal symptoms that can occur when you stop taking paroxetine suddenly (prickling, tingling sensation on the skin).
    Paxil (paroxetine) is an antidepressant drug used for the treatment of GAD and other anxiety disorders. 1 It's on par with Prozac and Zoloft in terms of effectiveness. It was created as a treatment for depression, just like other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
    While some SSRIs are linked to weight loss in the short term, long-term usage is mainly linked to weight gain. Treatment that lasts more than six months is called long-term use. Paroxetine, the most widely used SSRI, has been linked to weight gain in both long-term and short-term studies.
    The tablets, suspension, and controlled-release tablets are usually taken once daily in the morning or evening, with or without food. The capsules are normally taken once a day, with or without food, at bedtime. To avoid stomach upset, you should take paroxetine with food.
    For generalized anxiety disorder, take the following medications: adolescent— At first, 20 milligrams (mg) once a day, typically in the morning, was the recommended dosage. If necessary, your doctor can change your dosage. However, the daily dose is normally limited to 50 mg.
    The current studies have contributed to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of depression and provide experimental evidence for the use of paroxetine to treat depression.
    It's important to consider the half-life of Paxil (paroxetine) to figure out how long it'll last in your system. Paxil has a half-life of 21 to 24 hours, which ensures that half of the opioid is cleared from a person's bloodstream within 21 hours of stopping the medication.

    Citations:

  • Paroxetine, https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165%2F00003495-199141020-00007
  • Paroxetine in the Treatment ,https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0890856709603099