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Scopolamine

scopolamine
By Medicover Hospitals / 25 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Scopolamine

What is Scopolamine?

  • Scopolamine helps to avoid motion sickness-related to nausea and vomiting. This medication is also used to deal with irritable bowel symptoms or other issues with the intestines. It is also used to treat Parkinson's disease on a symptomatic basis. The secretions of certain organs in the body, such as the stomach and intestines, are reduced by scopolamine. Scopolamine is also used to treat some problems related to the stomach or intestines, muscle spasms, and symptoms similar to Parkinson's.
    1. Scopolamine Uses
    2. Scopolamine Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Overdose
    5. Scopolamine vs Ondansetron
    6. Frequently Asked Questions
    7. Citations

    Scopolamine Uses:

  • Scopolamine is used to avoid motion sickness or recovery from anaesthesia and surgery-induced by nausea and vomiting. This medicine works by correcting the excess of natural substances that can arise in motion sickness (acetylcholine and norepinephrine). It also blocks some brain impulses that can cause nausea and vomiting.
  • Scopolamine Side effects:

  • Some of the common side effects of Scopolamine are:
    • Agitation
    • Dizziness
    • Hallucinations
    • Pain while urination
    • Palpitations
    • Skin rash
    • Itching
    • Vomiting
  • Some of the serious side effects of Scopolamine are:
    • Headache
    • Nausea
    • Constipation
    • Drowsiness
    • Irregular heartbea
  • If you have any of these extreme symptoms, call your doctor immediately for more assistance. In any case, if you get any sort of reaction in your body, try to stop it because of Scopolamine. By seeing the issues, a doctor recommended you to take the medications and the benefits of this medicine are greater than the side effects.
  • Precautions:

  • Before using Scopolamine talk with your doctor if you are allergic to it or any other medications. The product may contain some inactive ingredients which can cause some serious allergic reaction or some other problems.
  • Before using Scopolamine talk with your doctor if you are having any medical history such as breathing problems, Glaucoma, heart disease, high blood pressure, seizures, esophagus problems, overactive thyroid, difficulty while urinating, kidney disease, liver disease and myasthenia gravis.
  • How to take Scopolamine?

  • Peel off the patch's clear backing and apply it behind the ear to a clean, dry, hairless skin area. To make sure the patch sticks well, especially around the edges, press firmly for at least 30 seconds. Over 3 days, the patch will slowly release the drug into the body. If it is bent, cut, or hurt, do not use the patch.
  • Apply the patch as instructed by your doctor, normally at least 4 hours prior to the activity that triggers motion sickness, if you are using the patch to avoid nausea and vomiting from motion sickness. Until it is no longer required, replace the patch every 3 days.
  • Apply the patch as instructed by your doctor, if you are using the patch to avoid nausea and vomiting following surgery. The patch is normally applied 1 hour before the operation to limit the baby's exposure to the medication if the surgery is for a caesarean section. As instructed by your doctor, remove and throw away the patch, normally 24 hours after surgery.
  • Throw away the old patch if the patch comes off or needs to be replaced, and put a new one on a clean, dry, hairless area behind the other ear. Using one patch at a time. Fold it in half with the sticky side together when tossing away the old patch, and throw away children and pets in the garbage.
  • Missed Dose:

  • There will not be any effect on your body if you skip one or two doses of Scopolamine. There is no issue caused by a missed dose. But for some medicine, if you do not take the dose on time, it will not work. If you miss a dose, the body can be affected by any unexpected chemical change. In certain cases, if you miss a dose, the doctor will remind you to take the prescribed medication as soon as possible.
  • Overdose:

  • Overdose of a drug can be accidental. If you have taken more than the prescribed Scopolamine tablets there is a chance of getting a harmful effect on your body’s functions. Overdose of a medicine can lead to some medical emergency.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding:

  • Use scopolamine with caution during pregnancy if the benefits outweigh the risks. Animal experiments suggest risk and no human studies are available or no animal or human studies have been conducted. Scopolamine is mixed into breast milk; be careful when breastfeeding.
  • Storage:

  • Direct contact with heat, air and light may damage your medicines. The exposure of medicine may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach. Mainly the drug should be kept at room temperature between 68ºF and 77ºF (20ºC and 25ºC).
  • Scopolamine vs Ondansetron:

    Scopolamine
    Ondansetron
    Scopolamine helps to avoid motion sickness-related to nausea and vomiting. This medication is also used to deal with irritable bowel symptoms or other issues with the intestines Ondansetron is a prescription drug that comes in the form of a tablet and solution. The medication is also available in an intravenous form which is given by the healthcare provider.
    Scopolamine is used to avoid motion sickness or recovery from anaesthesia and surgery-induced by nausea and vomiting. Ondansetron tablets are used for preventing nausea and vomiting caused due to some medical treatment.
    Some of the common side effects of Scopolamine are:
    • Agitation
    • Dizziness
    • Hallucinations
    • Pain while urination
    • Palpitations
    • Skin rash
    Some of the common side effects of Ondansetron are:
    • Headache
    • Constipation
    • Weakness
    • Tiredness
    • Chills
    • Drowsiness

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Scopolamine is used to prevent motion sickness or medications used during surgery from inducing nausea and vomiting. Scopolamine belongs to a class of drugs called antimuscarinics. It works by suppressing the effects on the central nervous system of a certain natural substance (acetylcholine).
    The key seems to be that acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter necessary for memory is inhibited by scopolamine. Scans also show that the drug stimulates the amygdala, a brain region that regulates fear and aggression. This would clarify the pacifying impact of scopolamine.
    These secretions can be improved by drugs, such as scopolamine or glycopyrrolate. A small patch on the skin, usually behind the ear, is one way that scopolamine can be conveniently administered. There doesn't seem to be much at times that benefits lower secretions.
    Scopolamine, an antagonist of the muscarinic receptor, inhibits the activity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and the concomitant occurrence of temporary cognitive amnesia and electrophysiological changes close to those seen in Alzheimer's disease.
    Some of the common side effects of Scopolamine are:
    • Agitation
    • Dizziness
    • Hallucinations
    • Pain while urination
    • Palpitations
    • Skin rash

    Citations:

  • Scopolamine ,https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00426713
  • Effects of Scopolamine in Man, https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1972-20453-001