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Hesperidin

hesperidin

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By Medicover Hospitals / 23 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Hesperidin
  • Hesperidin is a chemical from a plant classified as a "bioflavonoid." It is mainly found in citrus fruits. Hesperidin is most commonly used alone or in conjunction with other citrus bioflavonoids (such as diosmin) for disorders of the blood vessels, such as hemorrhoids, varicose veins, and impaired circulation (venous stasis). Lymphedema, a disorder causing fluid retention that can be a complication in breast cancer surgery, is often used to treat it.
    1. Hesperidin Uses
    2. Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Dosage
    5. FAQ's

    Hesperidin Uses:

    • Poor circulation, which can swell the legs (chronic venous insufficiency or CVI) - The taking by the mouth of a specific substance containing hesperidin methyl chalcone, butcher's broom, and vitamin C tends to alleviate the symptoms of poor leg circulation. It also appears to improve CVI symptoms by taking another product containing hesperidin and diosmin by mouth for 2-6 months, while taking the drug Venoruton may be more successful in treating this disorder.
    • Hemorrhoids - Some study indicates that taking hesperidin and diosmin raises anal hemorrhoid symptoms. It can also avoid the return of hemorrhoids after they have healed, which may help to make hemorrhoids worse.
    • Leg sores caused by the weak circulation of blood (venous leg ulcer) - When used along with compression dressings, taking a particular substance containing hesperidin and diosmin by mouth for 2 months appears to enhance the healing of tiny venous stasis ulcers.
    • Cholesterol-high - The majority of evidence indicates that taking hesperidin does not raise levels of cholesterol.
    • Obesity - Some research shows that in people who are slightly overweight, taking glucosyl hesperidin for 12 weeks doesn't reduce body weight.
    • Athletic productivity - Early research indicates that the use of hesperidin in cyclists five hours before a workout could improve speed and energy
    • Diabetes - Early evidence indicates that in women with type 2 diabetes, taking one tablet of a particular product containing hesperidin and diosmin by mouth for 45 days reduces blood sugar levels and increases blood sugar regulation. Research indicates that taking hesperidin every day can reduce blood pressure.
    • High blood pressure - Early research indicates that taking hesperidin in people with or without high blood pressure may decrease diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number), but does not decrease systolic blood pressure (the top number). But not all reviews agree.
    • Swelling in the arms or legs as a result of lymphatic system injury (lymphedema) - Early research indicates that taking a particular medication containing butcher's broom root extract, hesperidin methyl chalcone, and vitamin C by mouth for 90 days decreases upper arm and forearm swelling and improves mobility and heaviness in women with arm swelling following treatment for breast cancer.
    • In people who drink little to no alcohol, the build-up of liver fat (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or NAFLD). Early research indicates that in adults with NAFLD, taking hesperidin might improve liver function by a small amount. Rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid (RA). Early evidence indicates that drinking an alpha-glucosyl hesperidin-containing beverage for 12 weeks enhances RA symptoms.

    Hesperidin Side Effects

  • When taken orally: When taken orally for up to 6 months, hesperidin is Probably Safe for most individuals. If hesperidin is effective when taken for more than 6 months, there is not enough knowledge to remember. Side effects include discomfort and rage in the stomach, diarrhea, and headache.
  • Precautions

  • Pregnancy and Breast-feeding: Hesperidin, taken by mouth with diosmin, is Likely safe for pregnant or breast-feeding mothers.
  • Bleeding disorder: Hesperidin can slow the coagulation of blood and increase the risk of bleeding. Hesperidin could, in principle, make bleeding disorders worse.
  • Low blood pressure: Blood pressure can be reduced by hesperidin. In principle, in people who already have low blood pressure, taking hesperidin may cause blood pressure to become too low.
  • Surgery: Hesperidin can prolong bleeding. During and after surgical procedures, there is concern that hesperidin might increase the risk of bleeding. Avoid taking hesperidin for at least 2 weeks before the surgery is scheduled.
  • Dosage

  • Orally
  • A particular combination product containing hesperidin methyl chalcone 150 mg, butcher's broom root extract 150 mg, and ascorbic acid 100 mg has been used for impaired circulation that can cause the legs to swell (chronic venous insufficiency or CVI). Also, a combination of hesperidin 100-150 mg with diosmin 900-1350 mg taken every day for 2-6 months was used.
  • A combination of 150 mg hesperidin plus 1350 mg diosmin twice daily for 4 days, followed by 100 mg hesperidin and 900 mg diosmin twice daily for 3 days was used for hemorrhoids. In order to avoid the return of hemorrhoids, a combination of 50 mg of hesperidin plus 450 mg of diosmin twice daily for 3 months was also used.
  • A combination of 100 mg of hesperidin and 900 mg of diosmin daily for up to 2 months has been used for sores caused by weak blood circulation (venous leg ulcers).
  • Frequently Asked Questions:

    Hesperidin is most widely used for blood vessel disorders such as hemorrhoids, varicose veins, and impaired circulation, either alone or in conjunction with other citrus bioflavonoids (such as diosmin) (venous stasis).
    Hesperidin is a kind of flavonoid present in lemons and sweet oranges, as well as in various types of polyherbal formulations and in some other vegetables and fruits. Hesperetin is a hesperidin metabolite that has greater bioavailability.
    Diosmin is also taken with hesperidin in combination. BY MOUTH: For hemorrhoids: 1350 mg of diosmin plus 150 mg of hesperidin twice daily for 4 days was used for the treatment of hemorrhoids, followed by 900 mg of diosmin and 100 mg of hesperidin two times for 3 days.
    Hesperidin is a flavonoid present in lemons and sweet oranges, as well as in various polyherbal formulations and in some other vegetables and fruits. Hesperetin is a hesperidin metabolite that has greater bioavailability.
    Hesperidin might slow the coagulation of blood. The chances of swelling and bleeding may be increased by taking hesperidin along with drugs that often delay clotting.
    Hesperidin is a glycoside of flavanone present in citrus fruits. It is called hesperetin in its aglycone shape. The name of the fruit produced by citrus trees is derived from the word "hesperidium" The French chemist Lebreton first isolated Hesperidin from the white inner layer of citrus peels in 1828. (mesocarp, albedo).
    Pregnancy and breast-feeding- Hesperidin, taken by mouth with diosmin, is Likely SAFE for pregnant or breast-feeding mothers. Bleeding disorder: Hesperidin can slow the coagulation of blood and increase the risk of bleeding. Hesperidin could, in principle, make bleeding disorders worse.
    Recent studies have shown many benefits of hesperidin for cutaneous functions, including wound healing, UV defense, anti-inflammation, antimicrobial, anti-skin cancer, and skin lightening, in addition to its well-known benefits for cardiovascular function, type II diabetes, and anti-inflammation.
    Hesperidin is most widely used for blood vessel disorders such as hemorrhoids, varicose veins, and impaired circulation, either alone or in conjunction with other citrus bioflavonoids (such as diosmin) (venous stasis).
    Hesperidin can help function better in the blood vessels. It can decrease inflammation as well.
    Recent studies have shown many benefits of hesperidin for cutaneous functions, including wound healing, UV defense, anti-inflammation, antimicrobial, anti-skin cancer, and skin lightening, in addition to its well-known benefits for cardiovascular function, type II diabetes, and anti-inflammation.

    Citations:

  • Hesperidin , https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S030698772031358X
  • Effects of Hesperidin ,https://europepmc.org/article/med/7832973