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Clomifene

Clomifene

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By Medicover Hospitals / 19 April 2021
Home | Medicine | Clomifene

Clomifene

  • Clomifene (clomiphene) is a fertility medication used to treat women who do not ovulate, such as those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Twins are more likely to be born as a result of use. It is taken orally once a day for five days as part of a five-day course of treatment.
    1. Clomifene Uses
    2. Clomifene Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Interactions
    5. Dosage
    6. Storage
    7. Clomifene vs Letrozole
    8. Frequently Asked Questions
    9. Citations

    Clomifene Uses:

  • Clomifene is a medication that is used to induce ovulation (egg production) in women who do not produce ova (eggs) but want to become pregnant (infertility). It belongs from a class of drugs that are known as ovulatory stimulants. It functions similarly to estrogen, a female hormone that causes eggs to develop and be released from the ovaries.
  • How to use?

  • This is available as a tablet to be taken orally. It is usually taken once a day for five days, starting on or around day five of the cycle.
  • Take this at the same time every day to help you remember to take it.
  • Follow all the given directions on your prescription label exactly, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any parts that you don't understand.
  • It should be taken exactly as prescribed. Do not take more or less of it, or take it more frequently than your doctor has prescribed.
  • Side Effects

  • Some common side effects such as
    • Flushing (feeling of warmth)
    • Stomach Upset
    • Vomiting
    • Breast discomfort
    • Headache
    • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Some side effects can be serious call your doctor immediately if you have
  • Blurred vision
  • Visual spots or flashes
  • Double vision
  • Stomach or lower stomach pain
  • Stomach swelling
  • Weight gain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Precautions:

  • Inform your doctor if you are allergic to this medication or any other medications, tell your doctor and pharmacist.
  • Inform your doctor and pharmacist about all prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you use.
  • Inform your doctor if you have or have ever had liver disease, ovarian cysts (except those caused by polycystic ovary syndrome), uterine fibroids, abnormal vaginal bleeding, a pituitary tumor, or thyroid or adrenal disease, tell your doctor.
  • Consult your doctor if you are pregnant or nursing. If you become pregnant while using it, contact your doctor right away.
  • You should be aware that this can result in blurred vision. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you, especially in poor lighting.
  • You should be aware that this increases the likelihood of multiple pregnancies (twins or more). Discuss the risks of multiple pregnancies with your doctor.
  • Interactions:

  • This medicine has 5 disease interactions:
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding.
  • Hepatic dysfunction is a term used to describe a malfunction of the liver.
  • Pituitary gland activity
  • Adrenal dysfunction that is uncontrolled
  • Hyperlipidemia is a condition in which there is a buildup
  • Missed Dose

  • If you forget to take one of the dosages, take it as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose and proceed with your daily schedule. To cope up with a missed dose, do not take a double dose.
  • Overdose

  • Overdose of a drug can be accidental. If you have taken more than the prescribed tablets there is a chance of getting a harmful effect on your body’s functions.
  • Storage

  • Exposure of medicine to heat, air, and light may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach.
  • Clomifene vs Letrozole

    Clomifene
    Letrozole
    It is also known as clomiphene, is a fertility medication. It belongs from a class of medications known as ovulatory stimulants. Letrozole is a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (it reduces estrogen production) that is used to treat postmenopausal women with breast cancer.
    This is a medication that is used to induce ovulation (egg production) in women who do not produce ova (eggs) but want to become pregnant (infertility). This medication is used to treat certain types of breast cancer in women after menopause (such as hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer).
    It functions similarly to estrogen, a female hormone that causes eggs to develop and be released from the ovaries. It is frequently prescribed to women who have been taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamox) for at least 5 years. It is available as a generic medication.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    It is usually taken once a day for five days, starting on or around day five of the cycle. Take this medicine at the same time every day to help you remember to take it.
    It is a pill that is commonly used to treat certain types of female infertility. Clomid works by tricking the body into believing that your estrogen levels are lower than they are, causing the pituitary gland to secrete more follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).
    Only one in every twenty pregnancies conceived with it will result in twins. This is a pill that is taken orally to induce ovulation, results in twin pregnancies between 5% and 12% of the time. 1 That equates to less than one in every ten pregnancies.
    Women taking it are more likely to miscarry, but men taking it are not more likely to miscarry. It does not increase the risk of miscarriage on its own. Women who use it, such as those suffering from PCOS, are more likely to miscarry.
    You might experience stomach upset, bloating, abdominal or pelvic fullness, flushing, breast tenderness, headache, or dizziness.
    It is commonly used to treat female infertility. Although it is not approved by the FDA for use in males, it is frequently prescribed off-label for the treatment of male infertility. Clomid use can result in an increase in testosterone and sperm count.

    Citations:

  • Clomifene, https://www.bmj.com/content/332/7556/1485?ehom
  • Clomifene Dosage, https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article/27/2/468/2919315?login=true