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Triclabendazole

triclabendazole

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By Medicover Hospitals / 08 march 2021
Home | Medicine | Triclabendazole

What is Triclabendazole?

  • Triclabendazole is used to treat an infection caused by the parasite of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica. Triclabendazole is also known as Egaten is an anthelmintic indicated for the treatment of fascioliasis in patients 6 years of age or older. Infections with the liver fluke most often occur when animals consume infected water plants like watercress or algae. They travel from your intestines to the bile ducts in the liver where they live and grow. Most patients infected with liver flukes have no symptoms that may cause the infection to last a long time. This medicine is available with a prescription from your doctor only. The following dosage forms are available for this product- Tablet
    1. Triclabendazole Uses
    2. Triclabendazole Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Dosage
    5. Storage
    6. Triclabendazole vs Albendazole
    7. Frequently Asked Questions
    8. Citations

    Triclabendazole Uses:

  • Triclabendazole is used to treat fascioliasis (an infection usually in the liver and bile ducts caused by flatworms [liver flukes]) in adults and children 6 years and older. Triclabendazole is in a class of drugs called anthelmintics. It's working by killing the flatworms.
  • How to use Triclabendazole?

  • Triclabendazole comes as a tablet to be taken by mouth. It is usually taken every 12 hours for 2 doses. Take the triclabendazole with your food. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you don't understand. Take triclabendazole as directed. Do not take more or less of it than is prescribed by your doctor.
  • If the tablet cannot be swallowed whole or split in half, the tablet can be crushed and mixed with applesauce. Be sure to eat the mixture within 4 hours of preparation.
  • Triclabendazole Side effects

    •   Abdominal pain
    •   Heavy sweating
    •   Dizziness
    •   Nausea
    •   Vomiting
    •   Hives
    •   Itching
    •   Rash
    •   Lightheadedness
    •   Stomach pain
    •   Headache
    •   Shortness of breath
    •   Decreased appetite
    •   Diarrhea
    •   Fever
    •   Yellow skin or eyes

    Precautions:

    • When deciding to take a medicine, the risks associated with taking the medicine must be weighed against the benefits that it will do to you. This is a decision you and your doctor are going to make.
    • Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reactions to this medicine or any other medicine. Also inform your health care professional if you have any other kind of allergies, such as food, dyes, preservatives, or animals. Read the label or package ingredients carefully for non-prescription products.
    • Appropriate studies have not been conducted on the age-related effects of triclabendazole in children younger than 6 years of age.
    • Appropriate studies conducted to date have not shown any geriatric-specific problems that would limit the efficacy of triclabendazole in elderly people. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related problems with the liver, kidney, or heart, which may require caution and dose adjustment in patients receiving this medicine.
    • There are no adequate studies in women to determine the risk of infants using this medicine during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks.
    • Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to triclabendazole, albendazole (Albenza), mebendazole (Emverm), any other drugs, or any of the ingredients in triclabendazole tablets. Ask your pharmacist about the list of ingredients.
    • Many other drugs may also interact with triclabendazole, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking.
    • Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had a prolonged QT interval (a rare heart problem that can cause irregular heartbeat, fainting, or sudden death) or symptoms of the prolonged QT interval.

    Dosage

  • For different patients, the dose of this medicine will be different. Follow the orders of your doctor or the directions on the label. The following information only includes the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless the doctor tells you to do so.
  • The amount of medicine you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you use the medicine.
  • Missed Dose

  • If by mistake you have consumed too many doses at once, seek emergency medical help. Overdose of medications can lead to some very serious side effects.
  • Overdose

  • If by mistake you have consumed too many doses at once, seek emergency medical help. Overdose of medications can lead to some very serious side effects.
  • Storage and disposal

  • Let this medicine in the container in which it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of the kids. Store at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).
  • It is important to keep all drugs out of sight and reach of children, as many containers (such as weekly pills and eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can easily open them. To protect younger children from getting poisoned, always lock the safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safer place – one that is up and away and out of sight and reaches. Unnecessary medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, chiles, etc.
  • Unnecessary medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and others cannot consume them. You should not, however, flush this medicine down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is by taking the medicine. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn more about your community's take-back programs.
  • Triclabendazole vs Albendazole

    Triclabendazole
    Albendazole
    Triclabendazole treats fascioliasis and paragonimiasis Albendazole is an anthelmintic
    Formula: C14H9Cl3N2OS Molecular Formula: C12H15N3O2S
    sold under the brand name Egaten Brand names are Albenza, Alworm, Andazol, Eskazole, Noworm, Zentel, Alben-G, ABZ, Cidazole, Wormnil
    Triclabendazole is used to treat fascioliasis (an infection usually in the liver and bile ducts caused by flatworms [liver flukes]) in adults and children 6 years and older. It is a medication used for the treatment of a variety of parasitic worm infestations

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Triclabendazole is used to treat fascioliasis (an infection usually in the liver and bile ducts caused by flatworms [liver flukes]) in adults and children 6 years and older. Triclabendazole is in a class of drugs called anthelmintics. It's working by killing the flatworms
    It is generally not recommended to use during pregnancy. Once consult the doctor or pharmacist regarding use.
    Triclabendazole is generally considered a safe drug, although, after treatment, adverse events (AEs) may occur. These events are directly proportionate to the intensity of the infection and can be classified as systemic or mechanical.
    Side effects are as follows-
    • -Abdominal pain
    • -Heavy sweating
    • -Dizziness
    • -Nausea
    • -Vomiting
    • -Hives
    • -Itching
    • -Rash
    • -Lightheadedness
    • -Stomach pain
    • -Headache
    • -Shortness of breath
    • -Decreased appetite
    • -Fever

    Citations:

  • Triclabendazole, https://search.proquest.com/openview/835315fe84fbad0c58ee1591b6984c9c/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=33550
  • Triclabendazole side effects , https://academic.oup.com/tropej/article/45/3/135/1691286?login=true