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Propafenone

Propafenone

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By Medicover Hospitals / 16 April 2021
Home | Medicine | Propafenone

Propafenone

  • Propafenone, also known as Rythmol belongs to the class of drug called antiarrhythmic medication used to treat conditions characterized by rapid heartbeats, such as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Propafenone is a prescription medication. It is available in the form of an oral tablet and an oral extended-release capsule.
    1. Propafenone Uses
    2. Propafenone Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Interactions
    5. Dosage
    6. Storage
    7. Propafenone vs Flecainide
    8. Frequently Asked Questions
    9. Citations

    Propafenone Uses:

  • This medication is used to treat some serious (and potentially fatal) irregular heartbeats (such as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation). It is used to restore normal heart rhythm and keep the heartbeat regular and steady. Propafenone is an antiarrhythmic medication. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain electrical signals in the heart that cause irregular heartbeats. Treating an irregular heartbeat can lower your risk of blood clots, which can lower your risk of a heart attack or stroke.
  • How to use?

  • Take this medication orally, with or without food, every 8 hours, or as directed by your doctor. The dose is determined by your medical condition and response to treatment. To get the most out of this medication, take it on a regular basis. Start taking it at the same time every day. Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice during this medication use unless your doctor or pharmacist tells you to. Grapefruit might make this medicine more likely to cause side effects.
  • Side Effects

    • Strange taste in your mouth
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Dizziness
    • Constipation
    • Headache
    • Tiredness
    • Rapid or slow heart rate

    Precautions

  • Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it or if you have any other allergies before taking it. Inactive ingredients present in this product might cause allergic reactions or some other problems.
  • Inform your doctor or pharmacist about your medical history, especially if you have: breathing problems such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or emphysema, kidney problems, liver problems, myasthenia gravis, or a certain inherited heart condition. It has been linked to a heart rhythm disorder (QT prolongation). QT prolongation can rarely result in serious fast/irregular heartbeat and other symptoms that necessitate immediate medical attention.
  • If you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that may cause QT prolongation, your risk of QT prolongation may be increased. Before taking this, tell your doctor of all the medications you are taking, as well as if you have any of the following conditions - specific heart problems, a family history of specific heart problems.
  • Low potassium and magnesium levels in the blood may also increase your risk of QT prolongation. This risk may increase if you use certain medications (such as diuretics) or have conditions such as excessive sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. Consult your doctor about how to use propafenone safely.
  • This medication may cause dizziness. You may become drowsy if you consume alcohol. Don’t do driving, operate heavy machinery, or do anything else that requires alertness until you are confident that you can do so safely. Limit your intake of alcohol.
  • Inform your doctor or dentist that you are taking this medication before getting surgery.
  • Older adults may be more responsive to the drug's side effects, particularly QT prolongation.
  • This medication is not recommended to be used during pregnancy.
  • This medication is excreted in breast milk. Before breastfeeding, talk to your doctor.
  • Interactions

  • Drug interactions can change the way your medications work or put you at risk for severe side effects. Maintain a list of all the products you are using and discuss it with your doctor and pharmacist. Need not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medications without first consulting your doctor.
  • Aside from propafenone, many other drugs, including amiodarone, dofetilide, flecainide, pimozide, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol, macrolide antibiotics (such as clarithromycin, erythromycin), and certain quinolone antibiotics (such as sparfloxacin), can cause QT prolongation.
  • Other medications may interfere with the removal of this medicine from your body, affecting how propafenone works. Asunaprevir, desipramine, ketoconazole, orlistat, phenobarbital, phenytoin, rifampin, and certain HIV protease inhibitors (such as ritonavir, tipranavir) are examples.
  • Propafenone can slow the removal of other medications from your body, which may impair their effectiveness. Among the affected drugs are digoxin, imipramine, metoprolol, propranolol, and warfarin.
  • Missed Dose

  • If you forget to take one of the dosages, take it as soon as you remember. skip the missed dose and proceed with your daily schedule. To cope up with a missed dose, do not take a double dose.
  • Overdose

  • Overdose of a drug can be accidental. If you have taken more than the prescribed tablets there is a chance of getting a harmful effect on your body’s functions.
  • Storage

  • Exposure of medicine to heat, air, and light may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach.
  • Propafenone vs Flecainide

    Propafenone
    Flecainide
    Propafenone, also known as Rythmol, is a class 1c antiarrhythmic medication used to treat conditions characterized by rapid heartbeats, such as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Flecainide is an antiarrhythmic medication. Flecainide is a medication that is used to prevent and treat irregular heartbeats.
    This medication is used to treat certain types of serious (and potentially fatal) irregular heartbeats (such as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation). It is only recommended for people who have dangerous arrhythmias or who have significant symptoms that cannot be managed with other treatments.
    It works by inhibiting the activity of certain electrical signals in the heart that cause irregular heartbeats. It works by preventing certain electrical signals in the heart from causing irregular heartbeats.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Propafenone is a well-known antiarrhythmic agent in Class Ic. Despite having the typical chemical structure of a beta-blocker, human studies on its beta-blocking effects produced contradictory results.
    Propafenone belongs to the antiarrhythmic medication class. It works directly on the heart tissue, slowing nerve impulses. This aids in the maintenance of a normal heart rhythm.
    Combining metoprolol and propafenone can lower blood pressure and slow your heart rate. This can result in a slow heartbeat, headaches, arrhythmias, mental status changes, dizziness, or the sensation of passing out. If you take both medications at the same time, notify your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms.
    The more common side effects that are-
    • Strange taste in your mouth
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Dizziness
    • Constipation
    • Headache
    • Tiredness
    • Rapid or slow heart rate
    The single oral loading dose of propafenone appears to be highly effective for the conversion of recent-onset AFib, with a relatively quick effect within 2 to 3 hours and no serious adverse effects. It is available Form: oral tablet; Strengths: 150 mg, 225 mg, and 300 mg.
    Propafenone has the potential to cause serious heart problems. If you also take certain other medications for infections, asthma, heart problems, high blood pressure, depression, mental illness, cancer, malaria, or HIV, your risk may be increased. Many drugs can interact with propafenone.
    Rythmol is an anti-arrhythmic of Class IC that is used to prevent serious heart rhythm disorders. Rythmol comes in a generic form.
    Propafenone's average elimination half-life was 6 hours (range 2.4 to 11.8).
    Propafenone toxicity manifests itself in a variety of clinical manifestations, both cardiac and extracardiac. Propafenone toxicity is commonly associated with sinus bradycardia, rapid ventricular rates, nausea, and dizziness, according to the literature.
    Propofol's elimination half-life has been calculated to be between 2 and 24 hours. However, because propofol is rapidly distributed into peripheral tissues, its clinical effect lasts much shorter. A single dose of propofol for IV sedation typically wears off within minutes.

    Citations:

  • Propafenone, https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199002223220806
  • Effects of oral Propafenone, https://www.jacc.org/doi/abs/10.1016/0735-1097(96)00230-6