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Percocet

percocet

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By Medicover Hospitals / 27 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Percocet

What is Percocet

  • Percocet is a combination of acetaminophen and oxycodone. Oxycodone is an opioid pain medication. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic. Acetaminophen is considered to be a less potent pain reliever that might increase the effect of oxycodone.
    1. Percocet Uses
    2. Percocet Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Dosage
    5. Storage
    6. Percocet Vs Vicodin
    7. Frequently Asked Questions
    8. Citations

    Percocet Uses:

  • This combination medicine is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain. It contains an opiate pain reliever (oxycodone) and a non-opioid pain reliever (acetaminophen). Oxycodone works in the brain to change the way your body feels and responds to pain. Acetaminophen may also reduce fever.
  • How to take Percocet?

  • Read your medication Guide before you start taking oxycodone or acetaminophen and every time you get a refill.
  • Take this medicine orally as prescribed by the doctor. You can take this medicine with or without food. Ask your doctor about other ways to reduce nausea (such as lying down for 1 to 2 hours with as little head movement as possible).
  • Avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while taking this medicine unless your doctor says you can do so safely. Grapefruit may increase the chance of side effects.
  • If you are using a liquid form of this medicine, use a medicament measuring device to measure the prescribed dose carefully. Never use a household spoon because you may not have the correct dose.
  • The dosage depends on your medical condition and response to treatment. Never increase your dose, take the medicine more often, or take it longer than prescribed. Stop the medication properly when directed.
  • If you have pain, your doctor may also direct you to take long-acting opioid medications. In that case, this medicine may only be used for sudden (breakthrough) pain when needed. Other pain relievers (such as ibuprofen, naproxen) may also be prescribed with this medicine.
  • Although it helps a lot of people, it can sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have an alcohol addiction. Take this medicine as prescribed in order to reduce the risk of addiction. Tell your doctor if your pain is not getting better or if it gets worse.
  • Percocet Side effects:

    • Back, leg, or stomach pains
    • Cough
    • Fever with or without chills
    • Tiredness or weakness
    • Hoarseness
    • Lower back or side pain
    • Painful or difficult urination
    • Sore throat
    • Ulcers
    • Unusual bleeding or bruising
    • Bleeding gums
    • Bloating
    • Blood in the urine or stools
    • Blue lips and fingernails
    • Blurred vision
    • Burning
    • Crawling
    • Itching
    • Numbness
    • Prickling
    • Tingling feelings
    • Chest pain or discomfort
    • Cloudy urine
    • Clumsiness
    • Confusion
    • Constipation
    • Decreased awareness or responsiveness
    • Decreased frequency or amount of urine
    • Fast, noisy breathing
    • Difficulty in passing urine (dribbling)
    • Difficulty with swallowing
    • Dizziness
    • Faintness
    • Lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
    • Drowsiness
    • Dry mouth
    • Slow breathing
    • Fast or deep breathing
    • Irregular, pounding
    • Feeling of warmth
    • General body swelling
    • Hives or welts
    • Increased sweating
    • Increased thirst
    • Indigestion
    • Swelling on the face
    • Muscle aches
    • Tremors or weakness
    • Nervousness
    • Nosebleeds
    • Pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen
    • Pale skin
    • Pinpoint red spots on the skin
    • Pounding in the ears
    • Puffiness
    • Redness of the neck, arms, and upper chest
    • Restlessness
    • Seizures
    • Severe constipation
    • Severe sleepiness
    • Severe vomiting
    • Skin blisters
    • stomach cramps
    • Sunken eyes
    • Sweating
    • Thirst
    • Tightness in the chest
    • Trouble breathing
    • Vomiting
    • Weakness or heaviness of the legs
    • Weight gain

    Precautions:

  • Before taking this medicine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other opioids (such as morphine, codeine, oxymorphone); or if you have any other allergies.
  • Before using this medicine, tell your doctor or pharmacist about your medical history, in particular - brain disorders (such as head injury, tumor, seizures), breathing problems (such as asthma, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD), kidney disease, liver disease, mental or mood disorders (such as confusion, depression), personal or family history of substance use disorder (such as ovulation) (pancreatitis).
  • You may get dizzy or drowsy with this drug. Alcohol can make you dizzy or drowsy. Don't do the driving, use big machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Evite alcoholic beverages.
  • Liquid products may contain sugar, aspartame, or alcohol. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, alcohol dependence, liver disease, phenylketonuria (PKU), or any other condition that requires you to reduce or avoid these substances in your diet. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for safe use of this product.
  • Older adults may be more responsive to the side effects of this drug, especially confusion, dizziness, somnolence, and slow breathing.
  • This medicine should only be used during pregnancy when needed in urgent. It could harm an unborn child.
  • This medicine passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Tell your doctor if your child has the problem of unusual sleepiness, difficulty feeding, or difficulty breathing. Before breastfeeding, consult your doctor.
  • Note:

  • Do not share this medicine with others. It is against the law to share it. This medicine has only been prescribed for your current condition. Do not use it later for another condition unless your doctor tells you to do so. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you should have naloxone available to treat an overdose of opioids. Teach your family or household members about the signs of an overdose of opioid and how to treat it
  • Missed Dose:

  • If you are taking this medicine on a regularly scheduled basis and forget to take any dose, take it as soon as you remember it. If it is near the next dosage time, skip the forgotten dose.
  • Overdose:

  • If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or difficulty breathing, give them naloxone if available, then call the poison control center immediately. Symptoms of overdose may include slow/slow breathing, slow heartbeat, coma, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, sweating, stomach/abdominal pain, extreme tiredness, yellowing of eyes/skin, dark urine.
  • Storage:

  • Store protected from sunlight and moisture at room temperature. Different brands of this medicine have different storage needs. Check the product package for instructions on how to store your brand, or ask your pharmacist for instructions. Keep all drugs away from kids. Don’t flush the medication in the toilet or pour it into the drain unless instructed to do so. Discard this product properly when it has expired or is no longer needed. For more details, please read the Medication Guide or consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.
  • Percocet vs Vicodin

    Percocet
    Vicodin
    Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen) is a combination drug consisting of an opioid Vicodin is a strong prescription pain medicine that contains an opioid
    This combination medicine is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain. Used to manage pain that is severe enough to require opioid pain medicine.
    Brand Name: Percocet Brand Name: Vicodin
    Generic Name: acetaminophen and oxycodone Generic Name: acetaminophen and hydrocodone
    Percocet contains a combination of acetaminophen and oxycodone. Vicodin contains a combination of acetaminophen and hydrocodone

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    This combination medicine is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain. It contains an opiate pain reliever (oxycodone) and a non-opioid pain reliever (acetaminophen). Oxycodone works in the brain to change the way your body feels and responds to pain. Acetaminophen may also reduce fever.
    Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen) is a combination drug consisting of an opioid and a pain reliever and a fever reducer (analgesic and antipyretic) used for the management of moderate to severe pain, usually for a longer period of time. Percocet is available in a general form.
    • Back, leg, or stomach pains
    • Cough
    • Fever with or without chills
    • Tiredness or weakness
    • Hoarseness
    • Lower back or side pain
    • Painful or difficult urination
    • Sore throat
    When you take Percocet, it is initially absorbed by your gastrointestinal tract, and the peak level of oxycodone in your blood is reached within two hours. Pain relief starts more quickly, 10 to 15 minutes after taking Percocet, largely due to the oxycodone component. Peak pain relief is often felt between 30 minutes and 1 hour after a dose. Effects are felt for four to six hours, so the medication is usually prescribed every four to six hours. However, the drug test may be significantly longer than that.
    Do not take PERCOCET unless you are allergic to any of its ingredients. If you have signs of allergy, such as rash or difficulty breathing, stop taking PERCOCET and contact your health care provider immediately. Do not take more than 4000 milligrams of acetaminophen a day.
    Oxycodone is the same opioid as Percocet, Oxycocet, and Endocet. Both Percocet and OxyContin relieve pain, but while Percocet relieves for about five hours, the effect of OxyContin lasts for about 12 hours.
    Opioids like Percocet may cause serious health complications. The drug may increase the risk of shock to a person. It can also slow down a person's breathing, which may cause them to stop breathing completely. It is even possible to fall into a coma or die as a result of an overdose.
    If you take opioids during pregnancy, they can cause serious problems for your children, such as premature birth and the withdrawal of drugs called NAS. Even if you use an opioid exactly as your health care provider says, it can still cause NAS in your child.

    Citations:

  • Percocet, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0736467910001125
  • Subcutaneous Injection of Percocet , https://europepmc.org/article/med/26192735