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Lutein

Lutein
By Medicover Hospitals / 04 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Lutein
  • Lutein is naturally identified in a range of fruits and vegetables, especially those with deep green, orange and yellow colourings. Lutein is a form of xanthophyll which is often used in the treatment and prevention of eye diseases. Lutein products contained a natural substance classified as carotenoid, a group of antioxidant plant pigments. Lutein supplements provide a more concentrated supply of this antioxidant.
  • Lutein medications are typically used in alternative medicines for eye diseases such as cataracts and macular degeneration. Known to build up in the retina and lens of the eye, lutein is thought to protect the eye from injury caused by free radicals, chemical by-products that have been shown to damage cells, and to contribute to the development of certain diseases.
    1. Lutein Uses
    2. Lutein Side effects
    3. Dosage
    4. Lutein vs Astaxanthin
    5. Frequently Asked Questions
    6. Citations

    Lutein Uses:

  • Lutein is a type of vitamin that is called carotenoid. It's related to beta-carotene and vitamin A. Lutein-rich foods include egg yolks, broccoli, spinach, kale, corn, orange pepper, kiwi fruit, grapes, orange juice, zucchini and squash. Lutein is best absorbed when taken with a high-fat meal. Lutein is one of two major carotenoids found in the human eye as a color pigment (macula and retina).
  • It is thought to function as a light filter to protect eye tissues from sunlight damage.
  • Lutein supplements can improve visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness. Lutein supplements may help to treat vision problems caused by long-term exposure to light from computer screens.

    Side effects

  • Lutein and lutein supplements are likely to be safe when taken orally in appropriate amounts. Some patients, even those with skin cancer or cystic fibrosis, should be careful when considering lutein supplements. It is important to consult your doctor before taking any type of dietary supplement on a regular basis.
  • Dosage and Preparations

  • Consuming 6.9-11.7 mg of lutein per day in your diet seems to be safe. In research, lutein supplements have been used safely at doses up to 15 mg daily for up to two years. In addition, health experts note that taking up to 20 mg of lutein from both diets and supplements appears to be safe. High doses of lutein could cause a condition called carotenemia or yellowing of the skin that is harmless.
  • Dosage of Lutein: 6-20 mg/day
  • Lutein Benefits

  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): People who eat higher quantities of lutein in their diet appear to have a lower risk of developing AMD. But people who already eat high amounts of lutein may not benefit from increasing their intake. Taking lutein supplements for up to 36 months may improve some of the symptoms of AMD. A greater improvement in symptoms may be seen when lutein is taken at doses greater than 10 mg for at least 1 year.
  • Cataracts: Eating higher quantities of lutein is associated with a reduced risk of developing cataracts. Taking vitamins containing lutein and zeaxanthin reduces the risk of developing cataracts requiring surgical removal in people who eat low amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin as part of their diet. Also, the use of lutein supplements appears to improve vision in older people who already have cataracts and are not there.
  • Cancer which starts in White Blood Cells: People who eat greater amounts of lutein in their diet or take lutein supplements may have a lower chance of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Interactions

  • If your doctor has directed you to use this medicine, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before first checking with your doctor, health care provider or pharmacist. This information does not contain all possible interactions or adverse reactions. Therefore, tell your doctor or pharmacist about all the products you use before using this product. Keep a list of all your drugs with you and share this information with your doctor and pharmacist. Check with your health care professional or doctor for additional medical advice, or if you have any health questions.
  • Lutein vs Astaxanthin:

    Lutein
    Astaxanthin
    Lutein is naturally identified in a range of fruits and vegetables, especially those with deep green, orange and yellow colourings. Lutein is a form of xanthophyll which is often used in the treatment and prevention of eye diseases Astaxanthin is a reddish pigment that is part of a group of chemicals called carotenoids. It occurs naturally in certain algae and has a pink or red color in salmon, trout, lobster, shrimp and other seafood.
    Lutein is a type of vitamin that is called carotenoid. It's related to beta-carotene and vitamin A. Lutein-rich foods include egg yolks, broccoli, spinach, kale, corn, orange pepper, kiwi fruit, grapes, orange juice, zucchini and squash Astaxanthin is taken orally to treat Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke, high cholesterol, liver disease, age-related macular degeneration (age-related vision loss), and to prevent cancer.
    Consuming 6.9-11.7 mg of lutein per day in your diet seems to be safe. In research, lutein supplements have been used safely at doses up to 15 mg daily for up to two years. Astaxanthin is an antioxidant agent. This effect may protect the cells from damage. Astaxanthin may also improve the functioning of the immune system.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    A carotenoid with reported anti-inflammatory properties is lutein. A broad body of evidence demonstrates that there are many beneficial effects of lutein, especially on eye health. Lutein is considered, in particular, to improve or even prevent age-related macular disease, which is the leading cause of blindness and reduced vision.
    Based on the findings of liver function tests and visual function evaluations, no toxicity or side effects were associated with lutein supplementation at a dosage of up to 10 mg/d.
    There are no known side effects of lutein.
    The recommended dose for eye health: 10 mg of lutein per day and 2 mg of zeaxanthin per day. Safe upper limit: An upper limit has not been set by researchers either. Potential risks: They can make the skin slightly yellow in excess. Research seems to show that up to 20 mg of lutein per day is healthy.
    When taken by mouth in suitable quantities, lutein and lutein supplements are likely to be healthy. When considering lutein supplements, some patients, including those with skin cancer or cystic fibrosis, should be vigilant.
    "One egg yolk provides nearly 500 micrograms of lutein, and lutein in eggs is 200-300 percent more bioavailable than vegetable sources of lutein." Eggs have lipid-like lutein, which is easier to digest by the body.
    Lutein can help reduce inflammation in your eyes, fight off free radicals, reduce oxidative stress, and increase the sharpness of your vision due to its strong antioxidant properties.
    prevention of heart disease Lutein, a yellow pigment found in dark green leafy vegetables and egg yolks, can help prevent neck artery clogging

    Citations:

  • Lutein, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378427404000396
  • Uses of Lutein,https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2004.10719427