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Zeaxanthin

zeaxanthin

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By Medicover Hospitals / 04 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Zeaxanthin
  • Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid which plays an important role in protecting the eyes from the adverse effects of oxidation and light-induced damage. Zeaxanthin is a yellow pigment at the center of the macula. High levels have been found in dark green vegetables, orange and yellow fruits and egg yolks. Zeaxanthin is the most common carotenoid alcohol found in the nature of xanthophyll cyc. cycle. As a coexisting lutein isomer, zeaxanthin is synthesized in plants and in some micro-organisms. It provides a distinct yellow color to many vegetables and other plants, including pepper, corn, saffron and wolfberries.
    1. Zeaxanthin Uses
    2. Zeaxanthin Side effects
    3. Dosage
    4. Zeaxanthin Storage
    5. Zeaxanthin vs Astaxanthin
    6. Frequently Asked Questions
    7. Citations

    Zeaxanthin Uses:

  • Zeaxanthin is an eye vitamin that is drawn to the eyes once inside the body. It makes its way to the lens, the macula, and the fovea (the center spot of the retina). Zeaxanthin helps to build a yellow pigment shield to protect eye cells from the harmful effects of certain light sources, such as the sun. It also protects the eyes from dangerous free radicals that form from oxidation over time. Zeaxanthin, along with lutein, is the only dietary carotenoid which builds up in the retina, especially in the macular region. Because both drugs are found in large quantities in the macula, they are known as macular pigments.
  • Zeaxanthin Side Effects:

  • No known side effects or negative interactions of zeaxanthin with other drugs have been identified as of now. Although harmless, a person with fair skin may develop a yellowish skin color after exceeding the maximum recommended daily level for adults (10 milligrams).
  • Dosages

  • There is currently no recommended dietary intake for zeaxanthin. The amount of zeaxanthin your body needs may depend on the amount of stress you're under in your everyday life. For example, a smoker may need more zeaxanthin, as smokers tend to have lower levels of carotenoids than non-smokers.
  • It is assumed that most people consume about 1 to 3 mg of zeaxanthin per day through their diet. However, you may need more than this amount to reduce your risk of eye conditions. Fat improves the absorption of zeaxanthin, making it beneficial to include zeaxanthin in your diet. Try tossing a little olive oil in a green salad or add butter to the cooked green vegetables.
  • Zeaxanthin Benefits

  • Naphazoline ophthalmic is a temporary relief of minor redness in the eye or discomfort caused by minor irritants. If you have narrow-angle glaucoma, you should not use naphazoline ophthalmic. Stop using naphazoline ophthalmic and call your doctor at once if you have a continuous or worsening eye redness, eye pain, vision changes, severe dizziness or headache, buzzing in your ears, or shortness of breath.
  • Storage:

  • The following condition would get benefited from Zeaxanthin:
  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): Zeaxanthin and lutein supplementation could protect the eyes from AMD progression, which sometimes results in blindness.
  • Cataract: The cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye. Zeaxanthin and lutein intake may slow the formation of cataracts
  • Uveitis: Uveitis is an inflammation or swelling of the uvea of the eye. The uvea is situated near the center of the eye, between both the sclera and the retina, and is responsible for the blood supply to the retina. Zeaxanthin and lutein may help to slow down the inflammatory process.
  • Diabetic retinopathy: Diabetic retinopathy is a chronic disease caused by damage to the blood vessels in the retina. Supplementation with zeaxanthin and lutein may reduce oxidation processes that damage the eyes.
  • Zeaxanthin vs Astaxanthin:

    Zeaxanthin
    Astaxanthin
    Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid that plays a role in protecting the eyes from the adverse effects of oxidation and light-induced damage. Zeaxanthin is a yellow pigment located at the center of the macula. Astaxanthin is a reddish pigment that is part of a group of chemicals called carotenoids. It occurs naturally in certain algae and has a pink or red color in salmon, trout, lobster, shrimp and other seafood.
    Zeaxanthin helps to build a yellow pigment shield to protect eye cells from the harmful effects of certain light sources, such as the sun. Astaxanthin taken orally to treat Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke, high cholesterol, liver disease, age-related macular degeneration (age-related vision loss), and to prevent cancer.
    It is assumed that most people consume about 1 to 3 mg of zeaxanthin per day through their diet. However, you may need more than this amount to reduce your risk of eye conditions. Astaxanthin is an antioxidant agent. This effect may protect the cells from damage. Astaxanthin may also improve the functioning of the immune system.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid that plays a role in protecting the eyes from the adverse effects of oxidation and light-induced damage. Zeaxanthin is a yellow pigment in the center of the macula.
    The most common xanthophylls are lutein and zeaxanthin in green leafy vegetables (e.g. kale, spinach, broccoli, peas, and lettuce) and egg yolks. They also present in Einkorn, Khorasan, and durum wheat and maize and their food products.
    Lutein and zeaxanthin, like ultraviolet rays in sunlight, can help shield the eyes from harmful high-energy light waves. Studies indicate that a high level of both in eye tissue is associated with improved vision, especially in dim light or where glare is a problem.
    Lutein and zeaxanthin supplements tend to be associated with relatively few side effects. No adverse effects of lutein and zeaxanthin supplements over a span of five years were observed on a large-scale. Any skin yellowing that did not benefit inherent was the only side effect.

    Citations:

  • Zeaxanthin, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0167483800001412
  • Uses of Zeaxanthin,https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2004.10719427