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Lansoprazole

lansoprazole

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By Medicover Hospitals / 17 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Lansoprazole

What is Lansoprazole?

  • Lansoprazole, sold under the brand name Prevacid, is a drug that reduces stomach acid. It is used to treat peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Efficacy is similar to other proton pump inhibitors. The medication is taken orally.
    1. Lansoprazole Uses
    2. Lansoprazole Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Lansoprazole vs Pantoprazole
    5. Frequently Asked Questions
    6. Citations

    Lansoprazole Uses:

  • Lansoprazole is used to treat certain problems with the stomach and esophagus (such as acid reflux, ulcers). It works by reducing the amount of acid the stomach makes. It relieves symptoms such as heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and persistent coughing. This medicine helps heal acid damage to the stomach and esophagus, helps prevent ulcers, and can help prevent esophageal cancer. Lansoprazole is a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).
  • How to use

    • Read the Medication Guide and the Patient Information Leaflet, if available from your pharmacist before you start taking lansoprazole and every time you refill. Ask the doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.
    • Take this medicine by mouth as directed by the doctor, usually once a day, before a meal. The dosage and duration of treatment are based on the medical condition and response to treatment. The dose of children is also based on age and weight.
    • Handle your tablet with your dry hands. Put the tablet on your tongue and let it disintegrate. It takes less than a minute. Swallow the remaining particles with or without water. Do not crush, chew, or break down a tablet or a particle.
    • If you have trouble swallowing the tablet, dissolve it in water and take the mixture by mouth through an oral syringe. Place the tablet in an oral syringe and place the correct amount of water for your dose (4 milliliters for a 15-milligram tablet or 10 milliliters for a 30-milligram tablet) in the syringe. Shake the syringe gently to dissolve the tablet and swallow the liquid within 15 minutes. To make sure you have taken the full dose, refill the syringe with water (2 milliliters for the 15-milligram tablet, or 5 milliliters for the 30-milligram tablet), shake again, and swallow all the liquid. Do not prepare the liquid mixture for later use before time.
    • If you are taking this medicine through a gastrointestinal tube, ask your health care professional for detailed instructions on how to mix and give it properly.
    • Antacids may be taken along with this medicine if necessary. If you are also taking sucralfate, take lansoprazole at least 30 minutes before taking sucralfate.
    • Use this medicine regularly to make the most of it. To help you remember, take it every day at the same time. Continue to take this medicine for the prescribed duration of treatment, even if you feel better.
    • Tell your doctor if your condition persists or gets worse. The risk of side effects is increasing over time.

    Lansoprazole Side Effects:

    • Nervousness
    • Neuritis (inflammation of a nerve)
    • Numbness
    • Tingling in your hands and feet
    • Poor muscular coordination
    • Changes in menstruation
    • Low magnesium levels
    • Seizures
    • Dizziness
    • Abnormal or fast heart rate
    • Jitters
    • Tremor
    • Muscle weakness
    • Spasms in your hands and feet
    • Cramps or muscle aches
    • Spasms of your voice box
    • Serious allergic reactions
    • Rash
    • Swelling of your face
    • Throat tightness
    • Trouble breathing
    • Stomach pain
    • Watery diarrhea
    • Fever
    • Bone fractures
    • Kidney damage
    • Flank pain
    • Changes in urination
    • Rash on the skin and nose
    • Scaly, red, or purple rash on your body
    • Fever
    • Tiredness
    • Weight loss
    • Blood clots
    • Heartburn
    • Joint pain

    Precautions:

    • Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to lansoprazole or similar drugs (such as dexlansoprazole, omeprazole, pantoprazole) or if you have any other allergies before taking lansoprazole. This product may contain inactive ingredients that may cause allergic reactions or other problems. Please talk to your pharmacist for more details.
    • Tell your doctor or pharmacist about your medical history before using this medicine, in particular: liver disease, lupus.
    • In fact, some symptoms may be signs of a more serious condition. Get medical help right away if you have: lightheaded heartburn/sweating/dizziness, chest/jaw/arm/shoulder pain (especially with shortness of breath, unusual sweating)
    • Its medicine may contain aspartame. If you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to restrict your intake of aspartame (or phenylalanine), ask your doctor or pharmacist for the safe use of this medicine.
    • Tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use before you have surgery (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).
    • Proton pump inhibitors (such as lansoprazole) may increase your risk of bone fracture, especially with prolonged use, higher doses, and in older adults. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about ways to prevent bone loss/fracture, such as taking calcium (such as calcium citrate) and vitamin D supplements.

    Lansoprazole vs Pantoprazole:

    Lansoprazole
    Pantoprazole
    Molecular Formula: C16H14F3N3O2S Formula: C16H15F2N3O4S
    Brand name Prevacid Brand name Protonix
    Reduces stomach acid Used as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)
    Lansoprazole is used to treat certain problems with the stomach and esophagus (such as acid reflux, ulcers). Used in the treatment of stomach ulcers, short-term treatment of erosive esophagitis due to gastroesophageal reflux disease.
    Molar mass: 369.363 g/mol Molecular Weight: 383.4 g/mol

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Lansoprazole is used to treat certain problems with the stomach and esophagus (such as acid reflux, ulcers). It works by reducing the amount of acid your stomach makes. It relieves symptoms such as heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and persistent coughing. This medicine helps heal acid damage to the stomach and esophagus, helps prevent ulcers, and can help prevent esophageal cancer. Lansoprazole is a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).
    Your doctor will tell you how long to take lansoprazole (usually for 4 to 8 weeks). Some people may need to take it longer. It is best to take the lowest effective dose for the shortest time possible.
    This medicine works best if it is taken on an empty stomach 30 to 60 minutes before food. Take your medication at regular intervals. Do not take more than directed.
    Taking lansoprazole for more than a year may increase your chances of having certain side effects, including bone fractures. Infections of the gut. Vitamin B12 deficiency—symptoms include feeling very tired, a sore and red tongue, ulcers in the mouth, pins, and needles.
    Check with your doctor right away if you have a change in the frequency of urine or urine, blood in your urine, fever, joint pain, loss of appetite, skin rash, swelling of your body or feet and ankles, unusual tiredness or weakness, or unusual weight gain.
    No interactions were identified between lansoprazole and omeprazole. This does not necessarily mean that there are no interactions. Always consult with your health care provider.
    It relieves symptoms such as heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and persistent coughing. This medicine helps heal acid damage to the stomach and esophagus, helps prevent ulcers, and can help prevent esophageal cancer. Lansoprazole is a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).
    PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, and others) help reduce the amount of stomach acid produced by the glands in the lining of the stomach. Research published online on 15 February in JAMA Neurology has shown that there may be an association between chronic use of PPIs and an increased risk of dementia.
    For people with liver problems: if you have liver problems or a history of liver disease, you may not be able to remove this medicine from your body. If you have severe liver disease, your doctor may reduce your dose of lansoprazole.
    Specifically, the risk of clinical depression increased in those taking pantoprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole, while in those taking omeprazole and esomeprazole, only a trend of significance was noted.

    Citations:

  • Lansoprazole , https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00003495-199244020-00007
  • Lansoprazole treatment, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0002927001022444