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Calcipotriol

calcipotriol

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By Medicover Hospitals / 11 Mar 2021
Home | Medicine | Calcipotriol

What is Calcipotriol?

  • Calcipotriol is a synthetic form of vitamin D that belongs to the anti-psoriatic drug class. It prevents the development of skin cells, which helps to regulate psoriatic disease. The medication is a synthetic derivative of calcitriol or vitamin D. It belongs to the group of drugs known as synthetic vitamin D3 derivatives. It works by reducing the rate at which skin cells are formed.
    1. Calcipotriol Uses
    2. Calcipotriol Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Overdose
    5. Warnings
    6. Storage
    7. Calcipotriol vs Alfacalcidol
    8. Frequently Asked Questions
    9. Citations

    Calcipotriol Uses:

  • Calcipotriol is a drug that is used to treat plaque psoriasis, the most common form of psoriasis. Plaques are red scaly patches on your skin that form as a result of this disease. Over your elbows and knees, the scalp, and the lower part of your back are the most common areas affected. The patches can be itchy and vary in size from time to time. The aim of psoriasis treatment is to get rid of the plaque as quickly as possible.
  • Calcipotriol Side Effects:

  • Some of the common and major side effects of Calcipotriol are:
    • Rash
    • Irritation in skin
    • Itching
    • Redness
    • Worsening of psoriasis
    • Burnings
    • Dry skin
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Constipation
  • Calcipotriol can cause some serious side effects and can lead to some serious health problems. Talk with your doctor if you are having any serious problems.
  • Precautions:

  • Before using Calcipotriol talk with your doctor if you are allergic to it or medication related to it. The medication may contain some inactive ingredients which will cause serious allergic reactions or some other problems. Talk to your doctor if you are taking any prescription and non-prescription medication, vitamins, nutritional supplements and herbal products. Before using the medication talk with your doctor if you had any medical history like kidney disease, liver disease and abdominal pain.
  • How to use Calcipotriol?

  • This medicine can only be used on the skin. Apply a thin layer of the drug to the affected area and gently rub it in as prescribed by your doctor, usually once or twice daily for the ointment and twice daily for the cream or foam. Unless you're using this drug to treat your hands, wash your hands after using it.
  • The ointment is usually used once or twice daily. If it's recommended that you use it twice a day, do it in the morning and evening. Dovobet should not be used on any parts of your skin that you feel are contaminated, and any treated areas should not be covered with a bandage or dressing.
  • Missed Dose:

  • As soon as you remember, take the missing dose. If it’s time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and return to the daily dosing schedule. To make up for a missed dose, do not take a double dose.
  • Overdose:

  • Vitamin D overdose can have severe or life-threatening consequences. Nausea, lack of appetite, thirst, urinating more or less than normal, body aches, weakness, confusion, or erratic heartbeats are all potential opioid signs.
  • Warnings for Serious Health Conditions:

  • Pregnancy:
  • Topical treatment can be used safely, but large doses of salicylic acid, calcipotriol, topical steroids, and calcineurin inhibitors should not be used for lengthy periods of time. For pregnant women with extreme psoriasis, UVB phototherapy is healthy.
  • Breastfeeding:
  • During breastfeeding, the ointment should not be applied. Breastfeeding is not approved for long-term care or treatment of larger surfaces with calcipotriol. Before using the medication talk with your doctor while you are breastfeeding.
  • Storage:

  • Direct contact with heat, air and light may damage your medicines. Exposure to medicine may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach.
  • Mainly the drug should be kept at room temperature between 68ºF and 77ºF (20ºC and 25ºC).
  • Calcipotriol vs Alfacalcidol:

    Calcipotriol
    Alfacalcidol
    Calcipotriol is a synthetic form of vitamin D that belongs to the anti-psoriatic drug class. It prevents the development of skin cells, which helps to regulate psoriatic disease. Alfacalcidol is a Vitamin D active metabolite that plays a key role in calcium balance and bone metabolism.
    Calcipotriol is a drug that is used to treat plaque psoriasis, the most common form of psoriasis. Plaques are red scaly patches on your skin that form as a result of this disease. Alfacalcidol is a vitamin D supplement used to treat deficiency in conditions including hypocalcemia (low blood calcium levels), rickets (bone weakness), and others.
    Some of the common and major side effects of Calcipotriol are:
    • Rash
    • Irritation in skin
    • Itching
    • Redness
    Some of the common and major side effects of Alfacalcidol are:
    • Itching
    • Rash
    • Abdominal pain
    • Headache
    • Headache
    • Drowsiness

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Calcipotriol relieves inflamed, scaly areas by slowing the overproduction of skin cells. It's similar to vitamin D, which is required for good skin health. Calcipotriol is often used in conjunction with betamethasone, a steroid medication.
    After a period of 4-8 weeks, a major therapeutic effect is normally observed. It is possible to repeat the treatment. Calcipotriol Ointment 50 micrograms/g once daily in conjunction with topical corticosteroids (e.g., steroid in the morning and Calcipotriol Ointment 50 micrograms/g in the evening) is safe and well tolerated.
    Psoriasis is regulated by calcipotriene, but it is not cured by it. After two weeks, you may see some change in your condition, but it may take up to eight weeks to experience the full benefit of calcipotriene.
    Some of the common and major side effects of Calcipotriol are:
    • Rash
    • Irritation in skin
    • Itching
    • Redness

    Citations:

  • Calcipotriol, https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00003495-199243030-00007
  • Calcipotriol effects https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00128071-200102020-00008