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Niclosamide

niclosamide

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By Medicover Hospitals / 06 Mar 2021
Home | Medicine | Niclosamide

What is Niclosamide?

  • Niclosamide is a tapeworm treatment drug that is marketed under the brand names Niclocide and others. Diphyllobothriasis, hymenolepiasis, and taeniasis are examples of this. Other worms, such as pinworms and roundworms, are not affected. It is taken orally.
    1. Niclosamide Uses
    2. Niclosamide Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Overdose
    5. Storage
    6. Niclosamide vs Fenbendazole
    7. Frequently Asked Questions
    8. Citations

    Niclosamide Uses:

  • Niclosamide is an anthelmintic, which means it kills parasitic worms. Anthelmintics are medications that are used to treat worm infections.
  • Niclosamide is used to treat tapeworm infections such as large or fish tapeworm, dwarf tapeworm, and beef tapeworm. Niclosamide can also be used to treat other tapeworm infections if your doctor recommends it. It is ineffective against other forms of worm infections (for example, pinworms or roundworms).
  • Niclosamide kills tapeworms when they come into contact with it. The worms that have been destroyed are then passed in the stool. However, they are often destroyed in the intestine, you might not find them. Niclosamide can only be obtained with a doctor's prescription.
  • How to use

  • Niclosamide can be taken without food (either 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal). However, it is better taken after a light meal to avoid stomach discomfort (for example, breakfast).
  • Niclosamide tablets should be chewed or crushed thoroughly before being swallowed whole with a small amount of water. If you're giving this medication to a kid, grind the tablets into a fine powder and combine it with a small amount of water to make a paste.
  • For patients with beef tapeworms, broad tapeworms, or fish tapeworms who are taking this medication

  • Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor to help clear up your infection completely. One dose is usually sufficient. In certain patients, however, the second dose of this medication might be needed to fully clear the infection.
  • For patients with dwarf tapeworms who are taking this medication

  • Even if your symptoms improve after a few days, keep taking this drug for the full duration of treatment (usually 7 days) to help clear up the infection fully. In certain cases, the second course of this medication may be needed to fully clear the infection. Your infection can return if you stop taking this medication too soon. Make sure you don't miss any doses. Some patients with tapeworm infections do not experience any symptoms at all or may experience only minor symptoms.
  • Niclosamide Side Effects:

    • Abdominal pain
    • Stomach cramps or pain
    • Diarrhea
    • Loss of appetite
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Lightheadedness
    • Drowsiness
    • Itching of the rectal area
    • Skin rash
    • Unpleasant taste
    • Swelling of face

    Precautions:

  • Allergies: If you've ever had an irregular or allergic reaction to niclosamide or some other drug, tell your doctor. Also inform your doctor if you have any other allergies, such as those to foods, dyes, preservatives, or livestock. Read the ingredients on the bottle or box of non-prescription drugs carefully.
  • Pediatric: Niclosamide has been studied in a small number of children aged 2 and up and has not been shown to cause any different side effects or complications in children than it does in adults at adequate doses.
  • Geriatric care: Many drugs haven't been thoroughly researched in older people. As a result, it's unclear if they function the same way in older people as they do in younger adults, or whether they cause different side effects or issues. There is no clear data comparing niclosamide usage in the elderly to that in other age groups.
  • Breastfeeding: According to studies conducted on mothers, this drug presents a small risk to the child when used while breastfeeding.
  • Interactions:

  • While certain medicines can never be taken together, in other situations, two separate medicines should be taken together even though an association is possible. In these circumstances, the doctor might want to adjust the dosage or take other precautions. If you're taking some other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medications, let your doctor know.
  • Food-related interactions: Since interactions can occur, certain medicines should not be taken at or near the time of consuming food or eating certain types of food. Interactions may also occur when such drugs are taken with alcohol or tobacco. Talk to your doctor about whether you should take your medication with food, alcohol, or tobacco.
  • Dosage and administration:

  • This medicine's dosage can vary depending on the patient. Follow the doctor's orders or the label's instructions. Only the average doses of this medication are included in the following detail. If the dosage differs, do not alter it until your doctor instructs you to.
  • The amount of medication you take is determined by the medicine's potency. In addition, the number of doses you take per day, the interval between doses, and the period of time you take the drug are all determined by the medical condition for which the medicine is being used.
  • For oral administration (tablets)

  • Adults: 2 grams as a single dose for fish tapeworm or beef tapeworm. If necessary, the treatment can be repeated in seven days.
  • ChildrenDosage is calculated by your doctor and is dependent on body weight. 1 gram as a single dose for children weighing 11 to 34 kilograms (kg) (24.2 to 74.8 pounds). If necessary, the treatment can be repeated in seven days. 1.5 grams in a single dose for children weighing more than 34 kg (74.8 pounds). If necessary, the treatment can be repeated in seven days.
  • Dwarf tapeworm treatment:

  • Adults: They can consume 2 grams a day for seven days. If necessary, the treatment can be repeated in seven to fourteen days.
  • Children: Dosage is calculated by your doctor and is dependent on body weight.1 gram on the first day for children weighing 11 to 34 kg (24.2 to 74.8 pounds). Then, for the next six days, 500 milligrams (mg) once a day. If necessary, the treatment can be repeated in seven to fourteen days. 1.5 grams on the first day for children weighing more than 34 kg (74.8 pounds). Then, for the next six days, take 1 gram once a day. If necessary, the treatment can be repeated in seven to fourteen days.
  • Missed Dose:

  • Take this drug as soon as you remember if you miss a dose. If your next dose is approaching, skip the skipped dose and return to your daily dosing schedule. Do not take two doses at the same time.
  • Overdose:

  • Do not take too much or more than what is prescribed to you by your doctor. If by mistake someone has taken more, take them immediately to the hospital. Overdose can lead to something serious.
  • Storage:

  • Keep the medication away from the direct sunlight, moisture, and overt light in a closed jar at room temperature. Prevent the freezer from freezing. Keep out of children's control. Do not hold out-of-date or no-longer-needed medications
  • Niclosamide vs Fenbendazole:

    Niclosamide
    Fenbendazole
    Niclosamide is an anthelmintic Fenbendazole is a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic
    Formula: C13H8Cl2N2O4 Formula: C15H13N3O2S
    Molecular Weight: 327.12 g/mol Molar mass: 299.349 g/mol
    Brand name Niclocide Brand Names · Aniprazol + Praziquantel
    This is a medication used to treat tapeworm infestations. Fenbendazole is a medication used to treat a variety of parasite infections.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Niclosamide is used to treat tapeworm infections such as large or fish tapeworm, dwarf tapeworm, and beef tapeworm. Niclosamide can also be used to treat other tapeworm infections if your doctor recommends it. It is ineffective against other forms of worm infections (for example, pinworms or roundworms).
    Niclosamide kills tapeworms when they come into contact with it. Adult worms (but not ova) die quickly, probably as a result of oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling or ATPase activity stimulation. The worms that have been killed are either transferred in the stool or destroyed in the intestine.
    Niclosamide can be taken without food (either 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal). However, it is better taken after a light meal to avoid stomach discomfort (for example, breakfast). Niclosamide tablets should be chewed or crushed thoroughly before being swallowed whole with a small amount of water.
    Niclosamide is an antihelminthic drug that is used to treat tapeworm infections. Helminths (worms) are multicellular organisms that infect large groups of people and cause a variety of illnesses.
    Side effects
    • Abdominal pain
    • Stomach cramps or pain
    • Diarrhea
    • Loss of appetite
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Lightheadedness
    Niclosamide was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1982 for use in humans to treat tapeworm infection, and it is on the WHO's list of essential medicines. It has been used to treat millions of patients in a healthy manner.
    Niclosamide kills tapeworms when they come into contact with it. Adult worms (but not ova) die quickly, probably as a result of oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling or ATPase activity stimulation.
    Nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation, and itchiness are some of the side effects. Dizziness, skin rash, drowsiness, perianal itching, and an unpleasant taste are rare side effects. Praziquantel is a preferable and equally safe remedy for tapeworm infestation for some of these reasons.
    Niclosamide is classified as a pregnancy category B drug. There is a scarcity of information on the use of niclosamide in pregnant women. Niclosamide is not believed to be consumed systemically. Only if the possible advantage outweighs the danger to the fetus can niclosamide be used during pregnancy.

    Citations:

  • Niclosamide, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0898656817301018
  • Niclosamide Therapy for Tapeworm Infections, https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/abs/10.7326/0003-4819-102-4-550