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Inositol

Inositol

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By Medicover Hospitals / 14 April 2021
Home | Medicine | Inositol
  • Inositol is a vitamin-like compound. It can be found in a variety of plants and animals. It is produced in the human body as well as in a laboratory. Inositol can be found in a variety of forms (called isomers). Myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol are the most common forms.
  • It is a medication used for treating metabolic syndrome and (PCOS) polycystic ovary syndrome. It's also used to treat a variety of other ailments, but there's no good scientific evidence to back up most of these claims.
  • It may help with mental conditions such as panic disorder, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder by balancing certain chemicals in the body. It may also improve the efficiency of insulin. This could help with conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome or gestational diabetes.
    1. Inositol Uses
    2. Inositol Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Storage
    5. Inositol vs Niacin
    6. Frequently Asked Questions
    7. Citations

    Inositol Uses:

  • Panic disorder
  • This is good in reducing panic attacks and fear of public places or open spaces (agoraphobia). According to studies, inositol is as effective as a prescription medication. However, larger clinical trials are required before the efficacy of inositol for panic attacks can be proven.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS
  • A hormonal condition that results in enlarged ovaries with cysts Taking D-chiro-inositol or myo-inositol orally appears to lower triglyceride and testosterone levels, lower blood pressure, and improve ovarian function in overweight or obese women with PCOS. Taking both forms of inositol at the same time appears to improve blood pressure, blood sugar, ovulation, and pregnancy rates more than taking either form alone.
  • Premature birth
  • When compared to folic acid alone, taking inositol with folic acid during pregnancy appears to reduce the risk of having a preterm birth in women who are at a greater risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy. It is unknown whether inositol can help prevent preterm birth in women who are not at risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy.
  • Psoriasis
  • A skin condition caused by lithium appears to be improved by taking this medication orally. However, it does not help to improve psoriasis in people who do not take lithium. Inositol does not appear to alleviate the other side effects of lithium.
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • In postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome, taking inositol with or without alpha-lipoic acid appears to improve insulin resistance, cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure.
  • How to use

    • Take it orally or according to the prescription
    • You have to take 12 to 18 grams per day for panic disorder.
    • This has to be taken 18 grams per day for obsessive-compulsive disorder.
    • D-chiro-inositol 1200 mg per day is recommended for the treatment of symptoms associated with polycystic ovary syndrome.
    • Take 6 grams daily for the treatment of lithium-related psoriasis.

    Side Effects

  • The common side effects can be
    • Nausea
    • Gas
    • Difficulty sleeping
    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Tiredness

    Precautions:

  • It is safe for children aged 5 to 12 years old when taken orally for up to 12 weeks. It is also possibly safe when used for up to 10 days in the hospital for premature infants with a sudden and serious lung condition (acute respiratory distress syndrome or ARDS). On the other hand, it is not safe when used for more than 10 days in premature infants with ARDS.
  • It is safe to take orally during pregnancy and breast-feeding. There is not enough information available about the use of this medicine during breast-feeding. To be on the safer side, avoid using it during pregnancy.
  • Inositol has been shown to reduce blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c levels. Regularly check for signs of low blood sugar.
  • This tablet has been shown to reduce blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c levels. If you have diabetes and use inositol, keep an eye out for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and keep a close eye on your blood sugar levels.
  • Interactions

  • Some drugs can change the working mechanism of other medicines. No major interactions have been found associated with this drug but it is better to ask your doctor before taking it.
  • Dosage and administration

  • Myo-inositol (MYO) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI) are the two main forms of inositol found in supplements (DCI). Though there is no official agreement on the most effective type or dosage, the following have been shown to be effective in research studies:
    • 12–18 grams of MYO once daily for 4–6 weeks for mental health conditions.
    • For (PCOS) polycystic ovary syndrome, you can take 1.2 grams of DCI once daily for 6 months, or 2 grams of MYO and 200 mcg of folic acid twice daily.
    • For metabolic syndrome, take 2 grams of MYO twice a day for a year.
    • 2 grams of MYO and 400 mcg of folic acid twice daily during pregnancy for blood sugar control in gestational diabetes.
    • For type 2 diabetes blood sugar control: For 6 months, take 1 gram of DCI and 400 mcg of folic acid once daily.

    Missed Dose

  • If you forget to take one of the dosages, take it as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose and proceed with your daily schedule. To cope up with a missed dose, do not take a double dose.
  • Overdose

  • Overdose of a drug can be accidental. If you have taken more than the prescribed tablets there is a chance of getting a harmful effect on your body’s functions.
  • Storage:

  • Exposure of medicine to heat, air, and light may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach.
  • Inositol vs Niacin

    Inositol
    Niacin
    Inositol is a vitamin-like compound. It can be found in a variety of plants and animals. It is produced in the human body as well as in a laboratory. Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid, is an organic compound and a type of vitamin B3, which is required by humans. Plants and animals can produce it from the amino acid tryptophan.
    It has many functions in your body, including influencing neurotransmitter levels and how your body handles glucose. Niacin is a B vitamin that your body produces and uses to convert food into energy. It supports the health of your nervous system, digestive system, and skin.
    It may help with some anxiety disorders as well as your body's insulin sensitivity. Niacin (vitamin B-3) is frequently included in daily multivitamins, but most people get enough niacin from their diet.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Inositol is a carbohydrate found naturally in your body as well as in certain foods. It has many functions in your body, including influencing neurotransmitter levels and how your body handles glucose. It may help with some anxiety disorders as well as your body's insulin sensitivity.
    Inositol is a type of sugar that helps your cells maintain structure. It also has an impact on the insulin hormone and the function of chemical messengers in your brain.
    In adults, inositol is generally regarded as safe. If there are any side effects, they are usually minor and include nausea, stomach pain, tiredness, headache, and dizziness. The majority of side effects occur at doses greater than 12 g per day. Inositol's metabolic effects may not be suitable for everyone.
    Inositol aids in the normal insulin processing mechanisms of your body. Insulin is a hormone that the pancreas produces and releases into the bloodstream. Insulin enables our cells to absorb glucose (sugar) and generate energy.
    Many factors, such as decreased diet intake, increased catabolism and/or excretion, decreased biosynthesis, inhibition of gut and cellular uptake, and altered microbiota, all contribute to inositol deficiency.
    The most common inositol dosage is 500 milligrams taken twice per day. This dosage is increased to twelve to eighteen grammes per day for the treatment of OCD, panic disorders, and anxiety.
    Inositol supplements are available in the form of capsules or powder. Bowden suggests taking two grams of powdered inositol with water before bedtime for insomnia. Smaller doses (say, 500 mg) combined with other sleep-aid nutrients like melatonin work well for difficulty falling or staying asleep.

    Citations:

  • Inositol, https://www.nature.com/articles/nrm2334
  • Inositol derivatives: evolution and functions, https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.bi.61.070192.001301?journalCode=biochem