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Homatropine

homatropine

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By Medicover Hospitals / 24 Feb 2021
Home | Medicine | Homatropine

What is Homatropine?

  • Homatropine is an anticholinergic agent that acts as an antagonist against the receptors of muscarinic acetylcholine. It is present in antitussives, under the trade name Hycodan, in combination with bitartrate hydrocodone (dihydrocodeinone), indicated as an oral tablet or solution for the symptomatic relief of cough. Homatropine is included as homatropine methylbromide in subtherapeutic quantities to prevent intentional overdosage. Homatropine hydrobromide was administered as a cycloplegic ophthalmic solution to temporarily paralyze accommodation and cause mydriasis (pupil dilation); however, such therapeutic use was not approved for safe and efficient use by the FDA.
    1. Homatropine Uses
    2. Homatropine Side effects
    3. Precautions
    4. Overdose
    5. Homatropine vs Atropine
    6. Frequently Asked Questions
    7. Citations

    Homatropine Uses:

  • Homatropine relaxes the muscles in your eye's iris (the coloured part). Relaxing these muscles causes the pupil to dilate or expand. Ophthalmic homatropine (for the eyes) is used to treat a disorder called uveitis in the body. Ophthalmic homatropine is often used during an eye exam to dilate the pupil or to lower pressure inside the eye following eye surgery. This medicine is used to treat certain eye disorders prior to eye exams (e.g. refraction), before and during certain eye operations (e.g., uveitis). It belongs to a class of medicines referred to as anticholinergics. Homatropine hydrobromide works by expanding the pupil of the eye (dilating it).
  • Homatropine Side effects:

  • Some of the common side effects of Homatropine are:
    • Eye swelling, redness or crusting
    • Red or puffy eyelids
    • Agitation
    • Stinging
    • Burning after using the eye drops
    • Increased sensitivity of the eyes

    Precautions:

  • Before using Homatropine hydrobromide talk with your doctor if you are allergic to it or any other medications. The product may contain some inactive ingredients which can cause some serious allergic reactions or some other serious problems.
  • Before using the medications talk with your doctor if you are having any medical history such as:
    • Glaucoma
    • Keratoconus
    • Down syndrome
    • Brain damage
    • Spastic paralysis

    How to use Homatropine?

  • This medication is exclusively for external use. Take it as prescribed by your doctor in terms of dosage and length. Hold the dropper very close to the eyes without touching it. Squeeze the dropper gently and put the medication inside the lower eyelid. Wipe the excess liquid.
  • Clean your hands first in order to apply eye drops. Do not touch the dropper tip or let it touch your eye or any other surface to prevent contamination. Remove them before using eye drops if you are wearing contact lenses. Before removing your contact lenses, wait at least 15 minutes. Turn your head back, look upward, and pull down the lower eyelid to make a pouch. Place one drop in the pouch and keep the dropper directly over your eye. Look downwards and shut your eyes softly for 1-2 minutes. Place one finger (near the nose) at the corner of your eye and apply gentle pressure for 2-3 minutes. This will avoid the drainage of the drug. Try not to blink to prevent your eyes from scratching. If guided, repeat these steps for your other eye or if your dose is more than 1 decrease. If this drug is taken on a daily basis, it is usually administered 2 to 3 times a day, up to every 3 to 4 hours, or as prescribed by your doctor.
  • Missed Dose:

  • Take it as quickly as possible if you miss a dose of Homatropine Eye Drop. However, skip the missed dose and go back to your daily routine if it is almost time for your next dose. Please do not double the dose
  • Overdose:

  • Overdose of a drug can be accidental. If you have used more than the prescribed Homatropine eye drops there is a chance of getting a harmful effect on your body’s functions. Overdose of a medicine can lead to some medical emergency.
  • Interactions:

  • Interactions are not anticipated. Without asking your doctor or healthcare professional, do not use any other eye products. All possible interactions may not be described in this list. Give a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use to your health care provider. Some items could communicate with the medicine.
  • Storage:

  • Direct contact with heat, air and light may damage your medicines. Exposure to medicine may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach. Mainly the drug should be kept at room temperature between 68ºF and 77ºF (20ºC and 25ºC).
  • Homatropine vs Atropine:

    Homatropine
    Atropine
    Homatropine is an anticholinergic agent that acts as an antagonist against the receptors of muscarinic acetylcholine. Atropine belongs to a class of medicines known as antimuscarinics or anticholinergics. Atropine occurs naturally and is extracted from the alkaloid plant belladonna.
    Homatropine relaxes the muscles in your eye's iris (the coloured part). Relaxing these muscles causes the pupil to dilate or expand. Atropine is a prescription medicine used to treat symptoms of low heart rate (bradycardia), to reduce preoperative salivation and bronchial secretions, or as an antidote to cholinergic or mushroom poisoning overdoses.
    Some of the common and serious side effects of Homatropine are:
    • Eye swelling, redness or crusting
    • Red or puffy eyelids
    • Agitation
    Some of the side effects of Atropine are:
    • Blurred vision
    • Dizziness
    • Drowsiness

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    The combination of homatropine and hydrocodone used to treat runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, cough, and sinus congestion caused by allergies or the common cold. A narcotic cough medicine contains homatropine and hydrocodone and may be habit-forming.
    These therapeutic dilating drops (atropine and homatropine) can take up to 2 weeks for a longer duration of action. The daily administration of the drop may be necessary for treatment, despite the longer duration of action.
    The side effects of eyes dilation include:
    • Light sensitivity
    • Blurry vision
    • Trouble focusing on close objects
    The duration of vertical dilation of the pupil is shortest with 1% tropicamide (6 h), then 2% homatropine (12 h), 1% cyclopentolate (12 h), 1% atropine (24h) and longest for 0.25% hyoscine (96 h).
    Homatropine has a shorter duration of action and is less potent than atropine. It can be found as a hydrobromide salt. In order to reverse the muscarinic and CNS effects associated with indirect cholinomimetic (anti-AChase) administration, homatropine is also offered as an atropine substitute.
    Everyone's eyes react differently to drops in dilation. For your pupils to open fully, it normally takes 15 to 30 minutes. Within around 4 to 6 hours, most individuals are back to normal. For you, though, the effects could wear off sooner, or they could last much longer.

    Citations:

  • Homatropine, https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM196101262640403
  • Effects of Homatropine, https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/624867