Best Measles Treatment at Medicover | Symptoms & Complications

Measles, also called Rubeola, is a highly contagious, acute, and febrile respiratory viral disease. It is a viral disease that can prove serious for young children, but it is easily preventable by the measles vaccine. It is one of the main causes of worldwide mortality and morbidity, mostly in the regions of Africa and Southeast Asia. However, measles virus transmission is mainly observed among people who have travelled to high-risk countries and also among unvaccinated groups of the population (mostly children) in the community.

Measles symptoms

The symptoms of measles include :

  • High fever
  • Weakness
  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Pitted or cracked nails
  • A measles rash
  • Sore throat
  • Koplik spots inside the mouth
  • Muscle pain
  • Light sensitivity
Measles

The stages of measles disease

The measles virus infection can be segregated into different stages over 2 to 3 weeks.

  • Measles incubation period : In the first 10 to 14 days after getting infected, the measles virus spreads throughout the human body. During this time, there are no signs or symptoms of measles.
  • Not specific signs and symptoms : Measles disease starts with a mild fever, accompanied by a continuous cough, a runny nose, a sore throat, and red eyes (conjunctivitis). These mild measles symptoms may stay for 2 to 3 days.
  • Severe illness and measles rash : The rash consists of raised small red spots. A red blotchy rash in clusters first appears on the forehead. After a few days, the rash spreads to the other body parts. During this time, the patient experiences a high fever.

Causes

The measles virus thrives in the nose and throat mucus of an infected individual and the disease is capable of spreading to other people through coughing, breathing, and sneezing. When infected people talk, coughs, or sneezes, the contaminated droplets gets released into the air (where other people can inhale them) or settle on a surface, where they remain contagious and active for a longer time.


Risk factors

Risk factors for measles are as follow

  • Unvaccinated : By not taking the measles vaccine, a person is more vulnerable to measles infection
  • Traveling abroad : Travelling to high risk countries where measles is prevalent, can increases the risk of catching the disease
  • Vitamin A deficiency : Having vitamin A deficiency in the body, decreases the immunity, thus making measles symptoms more-severe.

Prevention

The measles vaccine is administered as a combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. The chickenpox (varicella) vaccination may also be included in this MMRV vaccine. Medical experts recommend that children get their MMR vaccine shot between 12 and 15 months of age and after that, between 4 and 6 years of age, before starting the school.


Measles vaccine in adults

The measles vaccine is administered as a combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. The chickenpox (varicella) vaccination may also be included in this MMRV vaccine. Medical experts recommend that children get their MMR vaccine shot between 12 and 15 months of age and after that, between 4 and 6 years of age, before starting the school.


Measles vaccine in pregnancy

The pregnant women should get vaccinated with measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, atleast a month before getting pregnant. This is done if they didn’t get vaccinated during childhood. Pregnant women can also take vaccines right after the delivery of the baby, even during breastfeeding.


The diagnosis of measles include

Know about the symptoms, prevention, and treatment of measles. Get information on this disease. Call now. Laboratory blood including a complete blood count (CBC) and tissue samples tests from a throat or nose swab and urine test can confirm the diagnosis.

The doctor may ask about the medical history such as

  • The child has received measles vaccines
  • Any travel history to high risk countries with prevalent measles disease.
  • Any close contact with an infected person.

The MMR vaccine's two doses are quite effective in prevention of measles disaese. The measles symptoms are generally mild in the vaccinated people.

Treatment for measles

Measles has no specific antiviral treatment. The management is primarily supportive like taking fever reducers, antibiotics and vitamin A. Controlling fever, dehydration, and infection including isolation are the main treatment methods.

According to WHO, administration of daily doses of vitamin A for two days and more days for undernourished children. Some measures can be taken to protect unvaccinated people after they've been exposed to the virus.

  • Post-exposure vaccination : Individuals with poor immunity to measles, and infants, can be administered the measles vaccine within three days of exposure to the measles virus.
  • Immune serum globulin : Adults including pregnant women and infants who are infected with the virus may receive an injection of proteins (antibodies) known as immune serum globulin. This can prevent the illness or make symptoms less severe.

Measles vaccine in pregnancy

The pregnant women should get vaccinated with measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, atleast a month before getting pregnant. This is done if they didn’t get vaccinated during childhood. Pregnant women can also take vaccines right after the delivery of the baby, even during breastfeeding.

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Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is the primary prevention of measles?

A measles-containing vaccination, usually given as the combination measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, can prevent the spread of the disease.

2. What are measles in babies?

The highly contagious measles virus produces flu-like symptoms along with a rash that covers the entire body. Since a virus causes measles, also known as rubeola, there is no particular medical cure for the illness.

3. Is measles caused by fungus?

The paramyxovirus is the type of virus that causes measles. This virus is extremely infectious and is often spread by minute droplets that are released when an infected person sneezes, coughs, or breathes.