ultrasound-test

Article Context:

  1. What is Ultra Sound Test?
  2. Why an ultrasound is performed?
  3. Risk factors
  4. How to be prepared for the test?
  5. How is an ultrasound test performed?
  6. Results

What is Ultrasound Test?

  • Diagnostic ultrasound, also known as sonography or diagnostic medical sonography, is a type of imaging that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of structures inside your body. The photos can help detect and cure a wide range of illnesses and disorders.
  • The equipment is like sonar and radar, which are used by the military to track planes and vehicles. An ultrasound helps the doctor to see organ, vessel, and tissue problems without making an incision.
  • Unlike other imaging methods, ultrasound does not use radiation. As a result, it is the recommended approach for viewing a developing fetus during pregnancy.
  • Why an ultrasound is performed?

  • Unlike other imaging methods, ultrasound does not use radiation. As a result, it is the recommended approach for viewing a developing fetus during pregnancy.
  • If you are experiencing discomfort, swelling, or other symptoms that cause an internal view of your organs, your doctor can order an ultrasound. An ultrasound may provide information on:
    • Bladder
    • Brain (in infants)
    • Eyes
    • Gallbladder
    • Kidneys
    • Liver
    • Ovaries
    • Pancreas
    • Spleen
    • Thyroid
    • Testicles
    • Uterus
    • Blood vessels
  • An ultrasound may also guide surgeon’s movements during surgical operations such as biopsies.
  • Are there any risks to the test?

  • Using low-power sound waves in diagnostic ultrasound is a healthy practice. There are no known dangers.
  • While ultrasound is a powerful tool, it has limitations. Since sound does not move well through air or tissue, ultrasound cannot be used to image body parts that contain gas or are covered by bone, such as the lungs or ears. The doctor can prescribe other imaging studies, such as CT or MRI scans or X-rays, to see certain areas.
  • How do you prepare?

  • Most ultrasound tests do not require any preparation. There are, however, a few exceptions:
    • Some scans, such as a gallbladder ultrasound, can require you to fast for a certain amount of time before the test.
    • Others, such as a pelvic ultrasound, can require an empty bladder. The doctor will advise you about how much water you can drink before the test. Do not urinate until the test has been completed.
    • Young children will need additional preparation. When booking an ultrasound for yourself or your child, consult a doctor and see if there are any specific guidelines you can follow.

    How an ultrasound is performed?

  • You'll also be laid down on a table with a part of your body uncovered for the test.
  • A sonographer, or ultrasound technician, will add a special lubricating jelly to the skin. This reduces pressure, allowing them to rub the ultrasound transducer on the skin. The transducer resembles a microphone in appearance.
  • The transducer transmits high-frequency sound waves into the body. When the waves strike a dense object, such as an organ or bone, they reverberate. These echoes are then returned to a screen. The sound waves have a frequency that is too loud for the average ear to detect. They shape an image that the doctor can interpret.
  • Depending on the area being examined, you might need to adjust your position to allow the technician better access.
  • The gel will be removed from your skin after the test. Depending on the area being investigated, the entire process usually takes less than 30 minutes. After the procedure, you will resume your daily activities.
  • Results:

  • When the test is over, a radiologist (a person who is qualified to view imaging studies) analyses the photographs and reports to the doctor. The doctor will inform you of the results.
  • After the ultrasound, be able to resume regular activities immediately.
  • If your pregnancy ultrasound results are abnormal, it does not imply that your baby has a major health issue. The doctor may recommend more testing to help confirm a diagnosis.
  • If you have a medical ultrasound, the significance of the findings would differ based on which part of the body was tested.
  • Frequently Asked Questions:

    The gallbladder, liver, kidneys, pancreas, bladder, and other tissues and areas of the body are imaged using ultrasound. Ultrasound may also detect blockages by measuring the flow of blood in the arteries.

    Using high-frequency sound waves, an ultrasound scan produces a picture of a person's internal body structures. Doctors typically use ultrasound to test a developing fetus (unborn baby), a person's stomach and pelvic organs, muscles, and tendons, or heart and blood vessels.

    Ultrasound imaging is also known as sonography or ultrasound screening. It uses a small probe known as a transducer and gel that is applied directly to the skin. High-frequency sound waves pass from the probe into the body through the gel.

    Unlike other types of scans, such as CT scans, ultrasound scans do not expose the patient to radiation. External and internal ultrasound scans are painless and have no side effects, but you may feel some pressure when the probe is rubbed into the skin or implanted into your body.

    The transducer transmits high-frequency sound waves into the body. When the waves strike a dense target, such as an organ or bone, they reverberate. These echoes are then returned to a screen. The sound waves have a frequency that is too loud for the average ear to detect.

    Ultrasound waves are used for this purpose. Icons of organs, tissues, and blood flow are produced. A sonogram is an image generated by the ultrasound. To put it plainly, sonography is a technique, and ultrasound is a method.

    You must fast for eight hours before your test. It is safe to drink water when taking medication. If an ultrasound pelvis is being performed, female patients can drink 32 ounces of water one hour before the test.

    Before the ultrasound, do not urinate (pee). A full bladder would allow you to see your uterus and ovaries more clearly. If close-up views of your uterine lining and ovaries are needed, you can have a transvaginal ultrasound after your pelvic ultrasound.

    Although ultrasound is generally regarded as safe with very low risks. Risks can increase with excessive prolonged exposure to ultrasound energy or when untrained users use the system.

    Physiotherapists also use therapeutic ultrasound to relieve pain, improve ventilation, and increase soft tissue mobility. Using ultrasound can aid in the reduction of inflammation, the reduction of pain, and the healing of fractures and wounds.

    Citations:

  • Ultra Sound Test - https://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1471-0528.1996.tb09910.x
  • Ultra Sound Test - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article/108/4/djv367/2412530?login=true
  • Ultra Sound Test - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1552-6569.2006.00088.x
  • Ultra Sound Test - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1161/01.cir.88.4.1730