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Dextrose

Dextrose
By Medicover Hospitals / 23 Dec 2020
Home | Medicine | Dextrose

What is Dextrose?

Dextrose is a normal form of sugar which is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy and all the cells and organs present in our body need glucose for functioning properly. Dextrose is used for treating low blood sugar and people with diabetes mellitus. It is given through injection for treating insulin shock, low blood sugar caused by using insulin and not eating enough food. This medicine helps in quickly increasing the amount of glucose in the blood.

  1. Dextrose Uses
  2. Dextrose Side Effects
  3. Precautions
  4. Frequently Asked Questions
  5. Citations

Dextrose Uses:

Dextrose helps in providing carbohydrate calories to the person who is not able to eat because of illness, trauma or any serious medical conditions. Sometimes these are given to people who are sick from drinking excessive alcohol. Dextrose is also used for treating Hyperkalemia, a high level of potassium in the blood.

Dextrose is a simple sugar which is derived from corn and various vegetables. It has many uses, such as sweetening foods and extending the shelf life of many products. Bodybuilders can use dextrose as a supplement. Doctors use dextrose to treat many conditions, including dehydration and hypoglycemia. Dextrose is an effective treatment for low blood sugar levels. It is inexpensive and widely available, making it a great option for people who tend to experience hypoglycemic episodes. However, it is very essential for carefully monitoring the blood sugar levels when using dextrose to avoid experiencing symptoms of high blood sugar. Dextrose is used for various reasons, such as:

  • For treating low blood sugar
  • For treating dehydration
  • For providing nutrition in combination with amino acids and other substances

Dextrose Side effects:

Taking too much of dextrose can cause some serious side effects:

  • Swelling
  • Rapid breathing
  • Excessive thirst
  • Diarrhea
  • Low blood phosphate
  • Fluid in lungs
  • Low blood magnesium
  • High blood sugar
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Abnormal heartbeat

Dextrose may lead to high blood sugar or can build up fluids in the body which can cause swelling in the lungs. People who are suffering from the following conditions should avoid the usage of dextrose:

  • High blood sugar
  • Swell in arms, legs or feet
  • Pulmonary oedema
  • Low levels of potassium in the blood

People who are taking Dextrose should carefully monitor the blood sugar levels for avoiding excessively high blood sugar.

If you are diabetic and your doctor prescribes oral dextrose gel or tablets, these should only be used when you have a hypoglycemic reaction. Your doctor or diabetes educator should teach you how to detect the signs of low blood sugar and when to use the tablets. The doctor may also explain to other family members when and how to use the gel or tablets, in case others need to give them to you.

Precautions:

Before taking Carbamazepine talk to your doctor if you’re allergic to any of the medications. Talk to your doctor if you are taking any prescription or non-prescribe medicine, vitamins, nutritional supplements, or any other herbal products. Avoid taking Carbamazepine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days.
Talk to your doctor if you had a serious medical history of::

  • Heart Problems
  • Liver or Kidney disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Porphyria
  • Low sodium levels

How to take Dextrose?

Use Dextrose as written on the label or as prescribed by the doctor. Avoid using the medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. The chewable tablet should be chewed properly before swallowing.

Your hypoglycemic symptoms should improve within about 10 minutes after taking oral dextrose. If not, take another dose. Seek medical attention if you still have symptoms of hypoglycemia after taking two doses. Dextrose injection is given intravenously into a vein. Avoid injecting the medicine into the muscle or on the skin. The injection must be given only as an intravenous (IV) injection. Tell your doctors if you feel burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when dextrose is injected. They may show you how to use an IV at home. Avoid giving yourself dextrose injection if you don’t understand how to use the injection and how properly you should dispose the needles, IV tubes, and other used items. Use a disposable needle, syringe, or prefilled syringe only one time. Follow state or local laws about disposing of used needles and syringes. Use a puncture-proof "sharps" disposal container (ask your pharmacist where to get one and how to dispose of it).

Call the doctor if the symptoms don't improve or if they get more worse. Check the expiration date on the medicine label and each time you use the medicine.

Dosages:

Dosage forms and strengths:

  • Intravenous
  • D50W
  • Acute Alcohol Intoxication:25-50 g (50-100 Ml of D50W solution) administered with thiamine (50-100 mg IV) for preventing Wernicke's encephalitis.
  • Sulfonylurea Overdose:Dextrose10-25 g (40-100 mL of D25W solution or 20-50 mL of D50W solution)
  • Insulin Overdoses:Dextrose 400-600 mg of glucose/kg/hour needed for most insulin overdoses
  • Hyperkalemia:Dextrose 25-50 g (250-500 mL D10W) plus 10 units regular insulin IV over 30-60 min

Missed Dose:

Missing one or two-dose of Dextrose won’t show any effect on your body. The skipped dose causes no problem. But with some medication, it won’t work if you don’t take the dosage on time. If you miss a dose some sudden chemical change may affect your body. In some cases, your doctor would advise you to take the prescribed medicine as soon as possible if you have missed the dose.

Overdose:

Overdose of a drug can be accidental. If you have taken more than the prescribed Dextrose tablets there is a chance of getting a harmful effect on your body’s functions. Overdose of a medicine can lead to some medical emergency.

Allergic Warning:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Swelling of throat or tongue
  • Hives or Rash
  • Blistering or peeling skin

Storage:

Direct contact with heat, air and light may damage your medicines. The exposure of medicine may cause some harmful effects. The medicine must be kept in a safe place and out of children’s reach.

Mainly the drug should be kept at room temperature between 68ºF and 77ºF (20ºC and 25ºC).

Before taking Dextrose consult your Doctor. In case if you face any problems or get any side effects after taking Carbamazepine rush immediately to your nearby hospital or consult your doctor for better treatment. Carry your medications always in your bag while travelling to avoid any immediate emergencies. Follow your prescription and follow your Doctor advice whenever you take Dextrose.

Dextrose vs. Maltodextrin

Dextrose Maltodextrin
Dextrose is a normal form of sugar which is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy and all the cells and organs present in our body need glucose for functioning properly. Dextrose is used for treating low blood sugar and people with diabetes mellitus Maltodextrin is a white powder which is tasteless and dissolves in the water. It’s an additive wide range of foods as it improves the texture, flavour and shelf life.
Dextrose helps in providing carbohydrate calories to the person who is not able to eat because of illness, trauma or any serious medical conditions. Sometimes these are given to people who are sick from drinking excessive alcohol. Dextrose is also used for treating Hyperkalemia, a high level of potassium in the blood. Maltodextrin helps in fast-digesting carbohydrate and it’s a versatile additive which preserves flavours in processed foods. It thickens the food, mimics fat content and also prolongs shelf life.
Taking too much of dextrose can cause some serious side effects:
  • Swelling
  • Rapid breathing
  • Excessive thirst
  • Diarrhea
  • Low blood phosphate
  • Fluid in lungs
  • Low blood magnesium
  • High blood sugar
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Some of the common side effects of Maltodextrin are::
  • Low blood phosphate
  • Fluid in lungs
  • Low blood magnesium
  • High blood sugar
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Frequently Asked Questions:

    Dextrose helps in providing carbohydrate calories to the person who is not able to eat because of illness, trauma or any serious medical conditions. Sometimes these are given to people who are sick from drinking excessive alcohol.
    Dextrose is one-third of the sweetness of table sugar but without any fructose. Dextrose is a normal form of sugar which is normally produced by the liver. Glucose is a source of energy and all the cells and organs present in our body need glucose for functioning properly.
    Dextrose injection is a sterile solution which provides extra water and carbohydrates to our body. This is given when a patient is not able to drink enough liquids.

    Citations:

  • Dextrose, https://europepmc.org/article/med/9070016"
  • Dextrose Uses,https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ie50179a028
  • Dextrose for Hypoglycemia,https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022347615013050