Contraception

           Contraception also knew as Birth control, and fertility control, are methods or devices used to prevent pregnancy. Planning, provision, and use of birth control are called family planning. The most effective methods of birth control are sterilization by means of vasectomy in males and tubal ligation in females, intrauterine devices (IUDs), and implantable contraceptives. This is followed by a number of hormonal contraceptives including oral pills, patches, vaginal rings, and injections. Less effective methods include barriers such as condoms, diaphragms and contraceptive sponge and fertility awareness methods. Long-acting reversible birth control such as implants, IUDs, or vaginal rings is of particular benefit in reducing rates of pregnancy.

Less effective methods include condoms, diaphragms, and contraceptive sponge and fertility awareness methods. Long-acting reversible birth control such as implants, IUDs, or vaginal rings is of particular benefit in reducing rates of pregnancy.

The least effective methods are spermicides and withdrawal by the male before ejaculation. Sterilization, while highly effective, is not usually reversible; all other methods are reversible, most immediately upon stopping them.

Safe sex, such as the use of male or female condoms, can also help prevent sexually transmitted. Emergency contraceptives can prevent pregnancy in a few days after unprotected sex.

After the delivery of a child, a woman who is not exclusively breastfeeding may become pregnant again after as few as four to six weeks. Some methods of birth control can be started immediately following the birth, while others require a delay of up to six months. In women who are breastfeeding, progestin-only methods are preferred over combined oral contraceptives.

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