Cervical Cancer

cervical-cancer

    Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cervix cells, the lower part of the vagina-connecting uterus.

    In causing most cervical cancer, different strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection, play a vital role.

    The body’s immune system normally stops the virus from harming when exposed to HPV. However, the virus lives for years in a small number of individuals, leading to the mechanism that causes certain cervical cells to become cancer cells.

    By having screening tests and getting a vaccine that protects against HPV infection, you will decrease the risk of developing cervical cancer.

    What Is Cervical Cancer?

    Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that begins in the cervix is cervical cancer. The Cervix is a hollow cylinder that connects the lower part of the uterus of a woman to her vagina is the cervix. The majority of cervical cancers begin on the surface of the cervix in cells.

    Basic Information About Cervical Cancer

    Cancer is a disease where cells develop out of control in the body. Cancer is often named for the part of the body where it begins, even though it later spreads to other areas of the body. It is called cervical cancer when cancer begins in the cervix. The cervix connects the upper part of the uterus with the vagina (birth canal). When a woman is pregnant, a baby develops in the uterus (or womb).

    All women have a chance of developing cervical cancer. It most commonly occurs in women over 30 years of age. The major cause of cervical cancer is a long-lasting infection with some forms of human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that, during sex, is transmitted from one person to another. At least half of those who are sexually active will have HPV at some stage in their life, but few women will have cancer of the cervix.

    Cervical cancer prevention can be aided by screening tests and the HPV vaccine. It is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life when cervical cancer is detected early.

    Cervical Cancer Types

    Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    In the exocervix, cervical cancers arise from cells. Carcinomas of squamous cells most often begin in the transformation region.

    Adenocarcinomas

    Cancers that grow from glandular cells are adenocarcinomas. Cervical adenocarcinoma grows from the endocervix’s mucus-producing gland cells.

    Mixed Carcinomas

    Cervical tumors, less generally, have both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinomas.

    Symptoms Of Cervical Cancer

    Many women with cervical cancer do not know that they have the disease early on because, in the late stages, it typically does not cause symptoms. When symptoms occur, common disorders such as menstrual cycles and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are easily mistaken

    The symptoms of common cervical cancer are:
    • Uncommon bleeding, such as after sex, between cycles, or after menopause
    • Vaginal discharge that has a distinct look or scent than normal
    • In the pelvis, the discomfort
    • The need to urinate more often
    • Pain during urination

    Cervical Cancer Risk Factors

    Many Sexual Partners

    The greater the number of sexual partners you have, and the greater the number of sexual partners your partner has, the greater the chance of receiving HPV.

    Some Other Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV/AIDS increases the risk of Human papillomavirus.

    An immune System That Is Weakened

    When your immune system is weakened by another health condition and you have Human papillomavirus, you may be more likely to develop cervical cancer.

    Smoking

    Smoking is linked with cervical cancer of squamous cells.

    Exposure To Medication For Miscarriage Prevention

    If your mother was taking a medicine called diethylstilbestrol (DES) when she was pregnant. You may have an elevated risk of cervical cancer called clear cell adenocarcinoma of a certain form.

    Cervical Cancer And Pregnancy

    It’s unusual to get a cervical cancer diagnosis when you’re pregnant, but it does happen. At an early stage, most cancers detected during pregnancy are discovered.

    It can be difficult to handle cancer when you are pregnant. Your doctor will be able to help you decide on a procedure based on the stage of your cancer and the extent to which you are pregnant.

    You may be able to wait for delivery before beginning treatment if the cancer is at a very early stage. You may need to determine whether to continue the pregnancy in the case of more advanced cancer, where care includes a hysterectomy or radiation.

    As soon as it can survive outside the womb, doctors will attempt to deliver your infant.

    Cervical Cancer Prevention

    A Pap smear and/or hrHPV examination is one of the best ways to avoid cervical cancer by getting screened regularly. Screening collects precancerous cells so that they can be treated before they grow into cancer.

    Infection with HPV triggers several instances of cervical cancer. The infection is preventable by the Gardasil and Cervarix vaccines. The most successful vaccine is before an individual becomes sexually active. It is possible to vaccinate both boys and girls against HPV.

    Here are a few other ways you can reduce the risk of cervical cancer and Human papillomavirus (HPV)

    • Limit the number of sexual partners
    • When you have vaginal, oral, or anal intercourse, always use a condom or some other barrier methods

    FAQ's

    The major cause of cervical cancer is a long-lasting infection with some forms of human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that, during sex, is transmitted from one person to another. At least half of those who are sexually active will have HPV at some stage in their life, but few women will have cancer of the cervix.

    • Uncommon bleeding, such as after sex, between cycles, or after menopause
    • Vaginal discharge that has a distinct look or scent than normal
    • In the pelvis, the discomfort
    • The need to urinate more often
    • Pain during urination
    Cervical cancer, if diagnosed at an early stage, is often curable. It is also possible to delay its development, extend its lifetime and alleviate any related symptoms, such as pain and vaginal bleeding, when cervical cancer is not curable. This is called palliative care.
    Generally, early-stage cervical cancer produces no signs or symptoms. Signs and symptoms of more advanced cancer of the cervix include the following: vaginal bleeding after sex, during cycles, or after menopause. Watery, bloody vaginal discharge that has a foul odor and can be thick.