Chronic-Kidney-Disease
By Medicover Hospitals / 26 Aug 2021

Home | Blog | Chronic Kidney Disease

Article Context:

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease
  2. Symptoms
  3. Causes
  4. Diagnosis
  5. Prevention
  6. FAQs

Chronic Kidney Disease

  • Chronic kidney disease (COD), commonly known as chronic kidney failure, is a condition in which the kidneys gradually lose function. Wastes and surplus fluids are filtered from your blood and expelled as urine by your kidneys. When chronic kidney disease progresses, your body might accumulate harmful quantities of fluid, electrolytes, and wastes. You may have few indications or symptoms in the early stages of chronic renal disease. Chronic renal disease may not be seen until your kidney function has deteriorated severely.
  • Chronic renal disease refers to a group of disorders that harm your kidneys and reduce their ability to keep you healthy by performing the tasks outlined. If your kidney condition worsens, wastes in your blood might build up to dangerously high levels, making you unwell. High blood pressure, anemia (low blood count), weak bones, poor nutritional status, and nerve damage are all possible problems. Every 30 minutes, your kidneys, which are each about the size of a computer mouse, filter all of your blood. They put forth a lot of effort to get rid of wastes, poisons, and excess fluid. They also aid in the control of blood pressure, the stimulation of red blood cell synthesis, the maintenance of healthy bones, and the regulation of vital blood molecules.
  • Symptoms

  • The majority of people do not experience significant symptoms until their renal disease has progressed. You may, however, observe that you:
    • Feel tired and have less energy
    • Trouble while concentrating
    • Poor appetite
    • Trouble sleeping
    • Muscle cramping at night
    • Swollen feet and ankles
    • Puffiness around the eyes
    • Dry, itchy skin
    • Often urination
  • Chronic renal disease can strike anyone at any age. However, some people are more susceptible to kidney disease than others. If you do any of the following, you may be at a higher risk for kidney disease:
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Family history of kidney failure

    Causes

  • Chronic kidney disease develops when a disease or condition inhibits kidney function for months or years, causing kidney damage to deteriorate. Chronic kidney disease is caused by a variety of diseases and situations, including:
  • Diabetes

  • Chronic kidney disease is linked to diabetes types 1 and 2. If the patient’s diabetes is not well controlled, excess sugar (glucose) can accumulate in the blood. Kidney disease is not common during the first 10 years of diabetes; it more commonly occurs 15-25 years after diagnosis of diabetes.
  • Hypertension

  • High blood pressure can harm the glomeruli, which filter waste products in the kidney.
  • Kidney Diseases

  • Including polycystic kidney disease, pyelonephritis, or glomerulonephritis.
  • Kidney Artery Stenosis

  • The renal artery narrows or is blocked before it enters the kidney.
  • Fetal Developmental Problem

  • If the kidneys do not develop properly in the unborn baby while it is developing in the womb.
  • Diagnosis

  • Blood Test
  • It may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease.
  • Urine Test
  • A urine test helps find out whether there is either blood or protein in the urine
  • Kidney Scans
  • kidney scans may include a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, computed tomography (CT) scan, or an ultrasound scan. It is to determine that there are any blockages in the urine flow. These scans can reveal the size and shape of the kidneys in an advanced stage of kidney disease. The kidneys are smaller and have an uneven shape.
  • Kidney Biopsy
  • It may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease.
  • Chest X-ray
  • It may be ordered to determine whether waste substances are being adequately filtered out. If levels of urea and creatinine are persistently high, the doctor will most likely diagnose end-stage kidney disease.
  • Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR)
  • GFR is a test that measures the glomerular filtration rate – it compares the levels of waste products in the patient’s blood and urine. GFR measures how many milliliters of waste the kidneys can filter per minute. The kidneys of healthy individuals can typically filter it over 90 ml per minute.
  • Treatment

  • Chronic kidney disease currently has no cure. Some medicines, on the other hand, can help control the signs and symptoms, lower the risk of complications, and limit the disease's course. Chronic renal disease patients often require a high number of drugs. The following are some of the treatments:
    • Changing your lifestyle can help you stay as healthy as possible.
    • Medicine is used to treat disorders such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.
    • Dialysis is a treatment that mimics some of the functions of the kidney.
    • In severe CKD, a kidney transplant is required.
  • Some of the treatment also manages some CKD complications like:
    • Fluid overload
    • Congestive heart failure
    • Anemia
    • Brittle bones
    • Weight loss
    • Electrolyte Imbalance
  • The advancement of kidney impairment can be slowed by addressing underlying issues such as hypertension and diabetes. When your kidneys start to fail, you have end-stage renal disease (ESRD). You may need dialysis or a kidney transplant if your kidney function drops to 10% or less.
  • Preventions

    • Keep blood pressure level below 140/90 mm Hg
    • If you are having diabetes, maintain target blood sugar level
    • Physical activity will help in maintaining blood pressure and blood sugar levels
    • Try to lose weight if you’re overweight
    • Get regular check-ups for CKD if you’re at high risk
    • Avoid excessive consumption of alcohol and avoid smoking
  • Consult a nutritionist if you have CKD to develop a kidney-friendly dietary plan. As you get older or your health state changes, your plan may need to modify. Take your medications as directed, and talk to your doctor about angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers, which can help protect your kidneys while also decreasing blood pressure.
  • Risk Factors

  • Some of the risk factors that will increase the risk of chronic kidney disease include:
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Heart and blood vessel
    • Smoking
    • Obesity
    • Family history of kidney disease
    • Abnormal kidney structure
    • Older age

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Some of the signs of CKD are:

    • Trouble while sleeping
    • Itchy skin
    • Feel of regular urination
    • Experiencing puffiness around the eyes

    Drugs that can be avoided with Kidney Disease are:

    • Pain medications
    • Proton pump inhibitors
    • Cholesterol medications
    • Diabetic medications

    With stage 5 CKD, males between the ages of 30 and 35 have a 14-year life expectancy without a transplant. The average life expectancy for women of the same age is 13 years. Between the ages of 70 and 75, both men and women have a 4-year life expectancy.

    Chronic kidney disease develops when a disease or condition inhibits kidney function for months or years, causing kidney damage to deteriorate. The main causes of COD are Diabetes and High blood pressure.

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